Miliband brothers: soon it will be time for peace to break out

Coalition will try to exploit differences for a long time to come.

After a long campaign that has brought the extraordinary spectacle of the brothers David and Ed Miliband cast as ruthless rivals, today may be the last day in which they emphasise their (real) political differences.

The deadline for voting is at 17.00 hours, and both camps are claiming their man is set to win. With tensions running high; Ed Miliband has just sent a campaign email appealing for extra votes and saying, in a clear attack on the rival camp:

This has been a campaign based not on the backing of large donors or of the New Labour establishment, but on the support of thousands of new and long-standing Labour Party members.

Very soon, though, such messages will be a thing of the past. After the votes are counted over the coming days, the results will be revealed on Saturday afternoon in Manchester. After the first real contest since Michael Foot was elected Labour leader in 1980, the new leader will be charged with ushering in a spirit of fraternity towards his brother as well as across his party. He will have to give an acceptance speech, interviews, a conference speech and then turn outwards to the electorate and against the coalition. Parliament returns after the conference season the following week, and the new leader will face David Cameron at Prime Minister's Questions.

There is no doubt that divisions between the Miliband brothers will be a key line of attack from the coalition. But if peace breaks out in the Labour party after this weekend -- and that is a big if -- there is one response the new leader will be able to give: the Tories and the Lib Dems have fought bitter leadership contests before, but none of the candidates has been able to say they loved their main rival. Labour MPs and activists will be hoping that after being so dramatically tested in this surreal contest, brotherly love will prevail for the sake of the party and the country.

PS: Here is Alastair Campbell, in today's Yorkshire Evening Post, showing how it is done when it comes to offering support for a candidate without treading all over the contest:

I am really hoping that David Miliband wins the leadership, I hope that there's a new team that does the strategy stuff. I would just love to see a younger generation come into it. Never say never but I feel at the moment that I have got a very different sort of life.


James Macintyre is political correspondent for the New Statesman.
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It's Gary Lineker 1, the Sun 0

The football hero has found himself at the heart of a Twitter storm over the refugee children debate.

The Mole wonders what sort of topsy-turvy universe we now live in where Gary Lineker is suddenly being called a “political activist” by a Conservative MP? Our favourite big-eared football pundit has found himself in a war of words with the Sun newspaper after wading into the controversy over the age of the refugee children granted entry into Britain from Calais.

Pictures published earlier this week in the right-wing press prompted speculation over the migrants' “true age”, and a Tory MP even went as far as suggesting that these children should have their age verified by dental X-rays. All of which leaves your poor Mole with a deeply furrowed brow. But luckily the British Dental Association was on hand to condemn the idea as unethical, inaccurate and inappropriate. Phew. Thank God for dentists.

Back to old Big Ears, sorry, Saint Gary, who on Wednesday tweeted his outrage over the Murdoch-owned newspaper’s scaremongering coverage of the story. He smacked down the ex-English Defence League leader, Tommy Robinson, in a single tweet, calling him a “racist idiot”, and went on to defend his right to express his opinions freely on his feed.

The Sun hit back in traditional form, calling for Lineker to be ousted from his job as host of the BBC’s Match of the Day. The headline they chose? “Out on his ears”, of course, referring to the sporting hero’s most notable assets. In the article, the tabloid lays into Lineker, branding him a “leftie luvvie” and “jug-eared”. The article attacked him for describing those querying the age of the young migrants as “hideously racist” and suggested he had breached BBC guidelines on impartiality.

All of which has prompted calls for a boycott of the Sun and an outpouring of support for Lineker on Twitter. His fellow football hero Stan Collymore waded in, tweeting that he was on “Team Lineker”. Leading the charge against the Murdoch-owned title was the close ally of Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and former Channel 4 News economics editor, Paul Mason, who tweeted:

Lineker, who is not accustomed to finding himself at the centre of such highly politicised arguments on social media, responded with typical good humour, saying he had received a bit of a “spanking”.

All of which leaves the Mole with renewed respect for Lineker and an uncharacteristic desire to watch this weekend’s Match of the Day to see if any trace of his new activist persona might surface.


I'm a mole, innit.