Ed Miliband’s hopes for a lasting fraternal relationship

“David and I will look back on this and laugh.”

There is, meanwhile, a fascinating interview with Ed Miliband in the Independent on Sunday, in which the younger brother says he hopes to spend Christmas with David and "look back and laugh" at the "odd" leadership contest, whatever happens.

He confirms a point, made in my report on the brothers in this week's magazine, that he never expected to run against David. But once again, although he says he is "not measuring the curtains", he shows he is indeed in it to win it, and emphatically denies ever telling his brother he would not stand.

Ed Miliband also shows that -- contrary to the message put about by some of his critics -- he is ready to attack the government. And -- rightly, as I outlined at the time -- he accuses the Lib Dems of planning to "sell out" to the Tories during the coalition talks after talking tough on cuts.

Ed's partner is expecting their second baby -- another boy. And, asked whom he would back if the boys ever run against each other in politics, he jokes that he will be supporting Diane Abbott in her nineties. But, more seriously and more revealingly, he corrects that to say that he would recommend to his offspring to stay out of politics altogether.

James Macintyre is political correspondent for the New Statesman.
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Watch: The evidence Nigel Farage said money sent to the EU should go to the NHS

After the EU referendum result, Nigel Farage said it was a "mistake" for Leave to suggest funds could go to the NHS. But what's this?

Remember Friday? (I know: it's not necessarily a pleasant thing to do, but bear with me.) On Friday, hours after the result of the EU referendum was announced, Nigel Farage appeared on Good Morning Britain and said that the Leave campaign advertising which linked the extra "£350m a week" Brexit would allegedly gift us with the NHS was a "mistake".

Sure, it was on posters, and emblazoned on a bus, and he didn't speak up to disabuse anyone of the notion. But let's give Farage the benefit of the doubt and pretend he does sorely regret the fact that, through no fault of his own, members of the electorate may have been led to believe that that money would be put into healthcare. It must be tough, when you ought to be high on your victory, to have to answer for other people's mistakes

Ah. Hold that thought.

It looks like the Independent has unearthed a video of Nigel Farage on television before the vote, and  strange thing  he tells Hilary Benn that the money currently being sent to Europe should be spent on, er, "schools, hospitals and the NHS".

Well, this mole isn't sure what to say. Maybe Farage doesn't remember this specific moment? Maybe when he said "schools, hospitals and the NHS" he actually meant something different, like "negotiating our exit from the EU", or "paying to access the common market despite no longer being a member"? Or maybe when he said that money should be spent on these things, he didn't mean it necessarily would be, and it would have been entirely unreasonable for the voting public to make such an absurd leap?

All I can suggest is that you watch and decide for yourself, dear reader.

I'm a mole, innit.