David Miliband lashes coalition over position on Europe

Splits between Lib Dems and Tories dramatically exposed.

From the Commons chamber:

David Miliband, the shadow foreign secretary and front-runner in the Labour leadership, is currently taking apart the Europe policy of the Conservative-Lib Dem coalition.

Earlier, William Hague, the new Foreign Secretary, tried to ridicule Miliband by saying that "the situation has changed" and that Miliband will have to "agree" with him over various cross-party issues.

But on Europe, Miliband did not hold back, pointing out that the Deputy Prime Minister himself, Nick Clegg, has called the Tories' new EU allies "nutters". He also quoted the Hague describing the Lib Dems as "fanatical federalists".

Finally, Miliband said that while the Foreign Secretary was good at "jokes", his new job would, "for the first time in a long time", require him to have "judgement".

Miliband's contribution has just been described as a "leadership speech" by Ming Campbell. That is unfair, because Miliband has offered similar messages repeatedly in recent years.

But there is no doubt that he has just shown -- with the force of his argument and his ability to take apart this rather awkwardly balanced coalition -- why he is front-runner to lead Labour and take on the Cameron-led government.

James Macintyre is political correspondent for the New Statesman.
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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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