David Miliband lashes coalition over position on Europe

Splits between Lib Dems and Tories dramatically exposed.

From the Commons chamber:

David Miliband, the shadow foreign secretary and front-runner in the Labour leadership, is currently taking apart the Europe policy of the Conservative-Lib Dem coalition.

Earlier, William Hague, the new Foreign Secretary, tried to ridicule Miliband by saying that "the situation has changed" and that Miliband will have to "agree" with him over various cross-party issues.

But on Europe, Miliband did not hold back, pointing out that the Deputy Prime Minister himself, Nick Clegg, has called the Tories' new EU allies "nutters". He also quoted the Hague describing the Lib Dems as "fanatical federalists".

Finally, Miliband said that while the Foreign Secretary was good at "jokes", his new job would, "for the first time in a long time", require him to have "judgement".

Miliband's contribution has just been described as a "leadership speech" by Ming Campbell. That is unfair, because Miliband has offered similar messages repeatedly in recent years.

But there is no doubt that he has just shown -- with the force of his argument and his ability to take apart this rather awkwardly balanced coalition -- why he is front-runner to lead Labour and take on the Cameron-led government.

James Macintyre is political correspondent for the New Statesman.
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Nigel Farage's exclusive Brexit plan has just been revealed and it's very telling

The panic is over.

If, a week on from Brexit, you're staring at the bottom of your gin bottle and wondering whether you'll ever afford to go on holiday again, then stop worrying. 

There's a plan.

Social media users have been sharing a link to an exclusive reveal of Nigel Farage's plan for the UK departure from the EU. Users are invited to: "View The Brexit Plan that was but together by the Vote Leave campaign, UKIP and Nigel Farage.

Here it is.

Highlighted policy topics include hot potatoes like UK access to the single market, international trade agreements and the rights of EU nationals working in the UK. You just have to click on the red button.

 

Oh. 

It seems the plan might be permanently out of reach. 

Every time you try to click on the red button with your mouse, you'll discover that it leaps away to another part of the page. So far, we haven't heard of anyone who has managed to catch the elusive button and discover the details of the brilliant plan. 

Other plans that have not been very easy to click on this week include: Boris Johnson's plan to be Prime Minister, Jeremy Corbyn's plan to lead a unified Labour opposition and David Cameron's plan to win the EU referendum in the first place.

As it turns out, a week after Brexit we are still waiting for a definitive plan. In the meantime, you can read: