Exclusive: Labour to show "Against the Odds" film in election broadcast

Victory for blog campaign

The Labour Party has decided to adopt as its next election broadcast the well-received film used before Gordon Brown's conference speech, called Against the Odds, Newstatesman.com has learned.

The two-and-a-half-minute broadcast, praised as "moving" by Labour delegates and journalists alike, runs through a brief history of the labour movement's leading figures, from Keir Hardie to Gordon Brown.

It begins with the words "It's the fighters and believers who change our world", and goes on to say that although it was said the son of a miner could never become a minister, "no one told Nye Bevan", a reference to the working-class architect of the National Health Service. Later the film moves into images of Michael Foot, Neil Kinnock, John Smith, Tony Blair and Brown with the words: "So here's to the fighters."

The decision by Labour to capitalise on the film is a victory for bloggers, especially the student Ellie Gellard who has been leading the campaign to persuade Labour to adopt the film on her site, The Stilettoed Socialist. Party insiders say it is indicative of an enhanced listening process aimed at grassroots campaigning, including on the blogs.

Miss Gellard, who describes herself as a "Bevanite", has won the support of Alastair Campbell and Eddie Izzard in her attempts to have the film used as the next Party Election Broadcast (PEB).

The decision to go ahead was taken during a conference call on Friday afternoon and is likely to be formally announced later today.

Miss Gellard says on her blog: "In a blogosphere dominated by right wing, angry men, I feel a certain responsibility to counteract or merely dilute their poison with a different viewpoint."

 

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James Macintyre is political correspondent for the New Statesman.
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Piers Morgan struggles with the idea that anyone might ever refuse an opportunity to go on television

The Good Morning Britain host has contradictory beef with Ewan McGregor.

Has it been a while since you heard what Piers Morgan thinks? Are you shaking from withdrawal, refreshing your Twitter feed, unsure whether Kanye is or isn’t a narcissist? Well, fear not, the Mole has a fresh fix for you. After Ewan McGregor dropped out of appearing on Good Morning Britain today, a new take was born. Actors’ opinions are stupid, but also, actors should come on Piers Morgan's show and talk about their not-important views.

McGregor, who was meant to be promoting Trainspotting T2 on the show, tweeted this morning he had cancelled because of Piers’ (obviously half-baked) opinions on the Women’s March. “Was going on Good Morning Britain, didn't realise @piersmorgan was host,” McGregor wrote. “Won't go on with him after his comments about #WomensMarch.”

What truthbomb had Piers dropped to provoke this? That it was unfair women were protesting and where was the MEN'S march. A march for men! As if running our parliament, corporate system, legal industry and creative sector isn’t enough! They should probably all do a walk too! Poor men. No wonder the patriarchy is on its last legs. They must be so weary.

Still, hats off to Piers Morgan. It takes a real personal flexibility to maintain the title of Contrarian Extraordinaire of the Our Glorious Nation. By which we mean that Piers Morgan will think literally anything, if the money is right. Whether it’s writing that Kim Kardashian is so awful she caused someone to have a stroke, or that he loves her for being herself, the man is so darn unpredictable. 

Morgan accused McGregor of being "just an actor", and that he should be “big enough to allow people different political opinions”. Once again, he asked the age-old question: are you an enemy of free speech if you won't go on someone’s early morning television show? This might be alien to Piers, but people don't have to go on television if they don't want to. 

And what if Ewan had appeared on the show chatting about his film? “Happy to appear on my show for your film, but not happy with my opinions? Classic money-driven actor,” the inevitable Morgan tweet would have read. It's quite easy, this Piers Morgan lark. No, it isn't. Yes it is. Cheque please! 

I'm a mole, innit.