Yvette Cooper claims another Tory PM for Labour: Robert Peel

The Tory love-in continues as Cooper praises Peel's "powerful principles".

Listening to Labour, one could be forgiven for wondering why anyone should have opposed the Conservative Party in the 19th century. After Ed Miliband's paean to Benjamin Disraeli yesterday, Yvette Cooper used her conference speech to pay tribute to another past Conservative prime minister - Robert Peel. The shadow home secretary said:

Down the road from here in Piccadilly Gardens stands a statue.

Sir Robert Peel, son of Bury, founder of the British police over 180 years ago.

Peel established powerful principles. Ed, you could call them One Nation principles – just a few decades earlier than Disraeli’s Free Trade Hall speech.

He said, “The police are the public, the public are the police.”

Able to uphold our laws not because of coercion but because of consent.

British police are not guards they are guardians.

Like Miliband, she invoked the Conservatives' past in order to damn their present.

Whatever happened to the party of Peel?

People used to think the Tories backed the police and supported law and order.

Not any more.

Weak on crime, weak on the causes of crime – that is David Cameron’s Conservative Party.

Elsewhere, channelling The Communist Manifesto, Cooper delivered the best line we've heard on "pleb gate".

So come on Conference, let’s bring on the plebiscite.

Plebs of the world unite, we have nothing to lose but this Government.

One trusts that Boris Johnson, who in his speech last year called for those who swear at the police to be arrested, is already preparing his own bon mots.

Yvette Cooper praised Robert Peel for establishing "powerful principles". Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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The big problem for the NHS? Local government cuts

Even a U-Turn on planned cuts to the service itself will still leave the NHS under heavy pressure. 

38Degrees has uncovered a series of grisly plans for the NHS over the coming years. Among the highlights: severe cuts to frontline services at the Midland Metropolitan Hospital, including but limited to the closure of its Accident and Emergency department. Elsewhere, one of three hospitals in Leicester, Leicestershire and Rutland are to be shuttered, while there will be cuts to acute services in Suffolk and North East Essex.

These cuts come despite an additional £8bn annual cash injection into the NHS, characterised as the bare minimum needed by Simon Stevens, the head of NHS England.

The cuts are outlined in draft sustainability and transformation plans (STP) that will be approved in October before kicking off a period of wider consultation.

The problem for the NHS is twofold: although its funding remains ringfenced, healthcare inflation means that in reality, the health service requires above-inflation increases to stand still. But the second, bigger problem aren’t cuts to the NHS but to the rest of government spending, particularly local government cuts.

That has seen more pressure on hospital beds as outpatients who require further non-emergency care have nowhere to go, increasing lifestyle problems as cash-strapped councils either close or increase prices at subsidised local authority gyms, build on green space to make the best out of Britain’s booming property market, and cut other corners to manage the growing backlog of devolved cuts.

All of which means even a bigger supply of cash for the NHS than the £8bn promised at the last election – even the bonanza pledged by Vote Leave in the referendum, in fact – will still find itself disappearing down the cracks left by cuts elsewhere. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.