Where do the public stand on abortion?

Forty nine per cent of women support a reduced time limit, compared with 24% of men.

To the likely dismay of Downing Street, Jeremy Hunt's comments on abortion are leading the news this morning, with David Cameron's restatement of support for the NHS entirely overshadowed.

In response to Hunt's call for a halving of the abortion time limit, from 24 weeks to 12, the Guardian's Katharine Viner tweeted: "If men could get pregnant, what would be the time limit on abortion?" It's a good question, but what's interesting (and to many, surprising) is that women have more conservative views on the subject than men.

A YouGov poll published in January found that 49% of women favoured a lower limit, compared with 24% of men. Of that 49%, 11% want it reduced to 22 weeks, 14% to 20 weeks and 23% to "below 20 weeks". Thirty per cent of women would like the limit to remain at 24 weeks, compared with 39% of men. However, asked if abortion should be banned altogether, eight per cent of men said it should, compared with five per cent of women.

In total, just 17% of people shared Hunt's view that the legal limit should be reduced to "below 20 weeks". Thirty four per cent said that it should remain at 24 weeks, five per cent said it should be increased, eight per cent said it should be reduced to 22 weeks and 12 per cent said it should be reduced to 20 weeks.

The unrepresentative nature of Hunt's views is further evidence of why the Health Secretary has done his party no favours by promoting them so strongly.

Abortion rights campaigners demonstrate outside the House of Commons in 2008. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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