The most important question not asked at the presidential debate

"Mr President, if they say 'cut back', will you say 'fight back'?"

Due to the Labour conference – and it being published well after midnight UK time – we missed this yesterday, but Business Insider's Joe Weisenthal went pretty strong on the one question he wanted asked at Wednesday's presidential debate, which focused on domestic policy. Of course, it flies against prevailing wisdom, so there wasn't actually much hope it would make the cut, but it is still the most important economic question either of the candidates could answer:

The next President is likely to face politicians in the House and Senate demanding immediate spending cuts.

As Americans sit at home and worry about the durability of the recovery, which one of you can promise to the American people that they don't have to worry about austerity under your watch?

The answers would be interesting to hear, that's for sure – especially with that framing.

The candidates during the debate on Wednesday night. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

Photo: Getty
Show Hide image

Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.