Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from today's papers

1. International Coming Out Day: The jokes are widespread, but there is a reality behind it Independent

My ex couldn't manage to come out to her parents while we were together, and it hurt, writes Rosie Wilby.

2. Trade unions and Tories march to the same beat Times (£)

They think they’re opponents but really they need each other, writes Matthew Parris.

3. David Cameron has shown why the Tories are the truly moral party Telegraph

The Prime Minister made a compelling case for his great social reforms at the Conservative Party conference, writes Peter Oborne

4. David Cameron's Conservatives are living a lie and he can't speak up Guardian

Cameron's conference speech held out the promise that Britain can go it alone, without Europe or the US. It's an illusion, says Martin Kettle.

5. Only by coming together can students and trade unions fight the Coalition's failing austerity Independent

Our writer, a student activist, argues that though we are about to see another wave of protests across Britain, it needs to be more co-ordinated if it is to be effective, writes Matthew Brett.

6. But what if Europe follows a different map? Times (£)

The Cameron-Hague plan for a new relationship with the EU forgets only one thing — all the other members, says David Aaronovitch.

7. Boris Johnson: brilliant, warm, funny – and totally unfit to be PM Guardian

For 20 years I've known London's mayor is a gold-medal egomaniac. If he gets into No 10, I'm on the first plane out, writes Max Hastings.

8. Cash upfront for the road to serfdom Financial Times (£)

Robert Shrimsley walks an employee through the fire-at-will policy.

9. David Cameron won’t win an election by adopting the politics of fear Telegraph

The Prime Minister must distil from a mish-mash of Tory policies a vision to unite the country, writes Mary Riddell

10. The Cost of Protecting Greece’s Public Sector New York Times (£)

Calls to slash a massive bureaucracy give way to the reality of the public sector’s political clout, writes John Sfakianakis.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Is the French Left having its Jeremy Corbyn moment?

Benoit Hamon won the first round of the Socialist party's presidential primaries. 

Has the French Left taken a Corbynite turn? That's certainly the verdict of many after the first round of the French Socialist Party's primary.

In first place is Benoit Hamon, who quit Francois Hollande's government over its right turn in 2014, and counts the adoption of a universal basic income, the legalisation of cannabis and the right to die among his policy proposals, with 36 per cent of the vote.

In second place and facing an uphill battle to secure the nomination is Manuel Valls, the minister who more than any other symbolized the rightward lurch of Hollande's presidency, with 31 per cent. That of the five eliminated candidates - under the French system, if no candidate secures more than half of the vote, the top two go through to a run-off round - only one could even arguably be said to be closer to Valls than Hamon shows the struggle he will have to close the gap next weekend. And for a variety of reasons, even supporters of his close ally Sylvia Pinel may struggle to put a tick in his box. 

Still, Valls clearly believes that electability is his best card, and he's compared Hamon to Corbyn, who "chose to remain in opposition". Also making the Hamon-Corbyn comparison is most of the British press and several high-profile activists in the French Republican Party.

Is it merited? The differences are probably more important than the similarities: not least that Hamon served as a minister until 2014, and came up through the backrooms. In terms of the centre of gravity and the traditions of his party, he is much closer in analogue to Yvette Cooper and Andy Burnham than he is to Jeremy Corbyn, though Corbynistas and Hamonites bear a closer resemblance to one another than their leaders to.

What will give heart to the leader's office is that Hamon surged in the polls after each debate, when his ideas were given a bigger platform. But what will alarm everyone in Labour is the French Socialists' poll ratings - they are expected to get just 6 per cent in the elections. (And before you scoff at the polls, it's worth noting that they have, so far, performed admirably in the French electoral cycle, picking up on the lightning rise of both Hamon and Francois Fillon.)

That attests to something it's easy to forget in Westminster, where we tend to obsess over the United States and ignore politics on the Continent, despite the greater commonalities: throughout Europe, social democratic parties are in a fight for their lives, no matter if they turn to the left or the right.

The Democrats, in contrast, won the presidential election by close to three million votes and lost due to the electoral college. They have good prospects in the midterm elections and their greatest threat is gerrymandering and electoral malfeasance. But absent foul play, you'd have to be very, very brave to bet on them going extinct.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.