"The Intruders" hand bottle of Bollinger to Barclays for "innovation in interest rate manipulation" (Video)

The group gatecrashed Investment Banking Awards in Mayfair to present the fake prize.

The Intruders, the group of tax justice campaigners who gave an "award" to HMRC boss Dave Hartnett for "services to corporate tax avoidance", have released a video of their latest stunt. Gatecrashing the Investment Banking Awards, members of the group handed Barclays a bottle of Bollinger champagne for "innovation in interest rate manipulation".

The award, a reference to the promise from a Barclays trader of a bottle of Bollinger in exchange for LIBOR manipulation, went uncollected. The group got a better reception than they did first time round, when they were told "you will depart immediately before we set the dogs on you," and called "Trespassing scum" by Robert Venables QC.

Watch a video of the whole event here:

The Intruders mission statement hints that they plan to be in it for the long haul:

Behind the closed doors of Mayfair hotels and Oxford colleges, the wealthy elite that caused the economic crisis celebrate their continued success over champagne and cosy dinner parties. Meanwhile, the rest of us face falling living standards, a bleak job market and decimating cuts to public services.

The wealthy elite believe they are unaccountable, that they are free from the consequences of the crisis they caused. They are wrong. The Intruders are here to crash the party and expose the excess and hubris of the people that got us into this mess.

Two members of the group onstage at the Investment Banking Awards. Photograph: Getty Images

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Jeremy Corbyn challenged by Labour MPs to sack Ken Livingstone from defence review

Former mayor of London criticised at PLP meeting over comments on 7 July bombings. 

After Jeremy Corbyn's decision to give Labour MPs a free vote over air strikes in Syria, tonight's Parliamentary Labour Party (PLP) meeting was less fractious than it could have been. But one grandee was still moved to declare that the "ferocity" of the attacks on the leader made it the most "uplifting" he had attended.

Margaret Beckett, the former foreign secretary, told the meeting: "We cannot unite the party if the leader's office is determined to divide us." Several MPs said afterwards that many of those who shared Corbyn's opposition to air strikes believed he had mishandled the process by appealing to MPs over the heads of the shadow cabinet and then to members. David Winnick declared that those who favoured military action faced a "shakedown" and deselection by Momentum activists. "It is completely unacceptable. They are a party within a party," he said of the Corbyn-aligned group. The "huge applause" for Hilary Benn, who favours intervention, far outweighed that for the leader, I'm told. 

There was also loud agreement when Jack Dromey condemned Ken Livingstone for blaming Tony Blair's invasion of Iraq for the 7 July 2005 bombings. Along with Angela Smith MP, Dromey demanded that Livingstone be sacked as the co-chair of Labour's defence review. Significantly, Benn said aftewards that he agreed with every word Dromey had said. Corbyn's office has previously said that it is up to the NEC, not the leader, whether the former London mayor holds the position. In reference to 7 July, an aide repeated Corbyn's statement that he preferred to "remember the brilliant words Ken used after 7/7". 

As on previous occasions, MPs complained that the leader failed to answer the questions that were put to him. A shadow minister told me that he "dodged" one on whether he believed the UK should end air strikes against Isis in Iraq. In reference to Syria, a Corbyn aide said afterwards that "There was significant support for the leader. There was a wide debate, with people speaking on both sides of the arguments." After David Cameron's decision to call a vote on air strikes for Wednesday, leaving only a day for debate, the number of Labour MPs backing intervention is likely to fall. One shadow minister told me that as few as 40-50 may back the government, though most expect the total to be closer to the original figure of 99. 

At the end of another remarkable day in Labour's history, a Corbyn aide concluded: "It was always going to be a bumpy ride when you have a leader who was elected by a large number outside parliament but whose support in the PLP is quite limited. There are a small number who find it hard to come to terms with that result."

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.