Morning Call: pick of the papers

The ten must-read comment pieces from this morning's papers.

1. Cameron’s demolition job risks tearing the country from its past (Daily Telegraph)

Whichever is the more conservative party is likely to win the next election – and right now that looks like Labour, writes Mary Riddell.

2. An unhappy marriage: union influence may cost Labour election chances (Independent)

By threatening more strikes union leaders prove they have not adjusted to poorer times - and their selfishness will only push voters away, says Steve Richards.

3. Democracy loses in struggle to save euro (Financial Times)

The sight of the German representative on the ECB being isolated and outvoted was chilling, says Gideon Rachman.

4. Why the whiff of success clings to Brand Boris (Times) (£)

David Cameron must rediscover the qualities that won him the leadership to see off the Mayor’s challenge, says Rachel Sylvester.

5. The universal credit programme is on course for disaster (Guardian)

Iain Duncan Smith's plan to streamline our benefits system is practically unachievable, says Frank Field.

6. Tories may regret their disdain of Romney (Financial Times)

It is folly to have such poor relations with a party that could soon hold the world’s mightiest office, argues Janan Ganesh.

7. Alzheimer's could be the most catastrophic impact of junk food (Guardian)

There is evidence that poor diet is one cause of Alzheimer's, writes George Monbiot. If ever there was a case for the precautionary principle, this is it.

8. Europe's Dutch barometer (Independent)

Holland’s fragmented politics have become more divided than ever, says an Independent leader.

9. Conservative party: cheers, fears and falling ratings (Guardian)

Mr Johnson may be the Tories' prince over the water now, but golden summers and victory parades do not last for ever, says a Guardian editorial.

10. Black Wednesday: The day that Britain went over the edge (Daily Telegraph)

Black Wednesday was a fateful moment that changed our country – and shaped a future prime minister, writes Philip Johnston.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.