Romney confuses "Sikh" with "sheikh"

Republican candidate misspeaks in tribute to Wisconsin temple shooting victims.

In a competitive field, this may be Mitt Romney's worst gaffe yet. Discussing the Wisconsin shooting last night, the Republican presidential candidate twice mistakenly used the word "sheikh", denoting an Arab leader, rather than "Sikh", the religion of the victims.

Speaking at a fundraising event in West Des Moines, he said:

I was in Chicago earlier today. We had a moment of silence in honor of the people who lost their lives at that sheikh temple. I noted that it was a tragedy for many, many reasons. Among them are the fact that people, the sheikh people are among the most peaceable and loving individuals you can imagine, as is their faith.

Asked later about the slip, Romney spokesman Rick Gorka explained: "He misspoke. It was the end of the day. He mispronounced similar sounding words. He was clearly referring to the tragedy in Wisconsin. You clearly heard him talk about it earlier today in Chicago."

Fortunately for Romney, his linguistic shortcomings didn't prevent him raising $1.8m dollars in the "most successful presidential fundraiser we have ever had in the history of the state of Iowa."

Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.