What David Miliband's latest intervention means

The politics behind the Labour MP's New Statesman leader.

David Miliband's leader in this week's New Statesman, which he has guest-edited, is his most significant political intervention since his much-discussed attack on "Reassurance Labour" in the NS earlier this year. In an echo of that piece, the former foreign secretary mounts a critique of "defensive social democracy", an explicit rebuke to those in Labour who believe the party should simply ride the wave of discontent over austerity. He writes:

[I]f defensive social democracy delivers a win - and it is a big if- the problem will be with governing.

Miliband acknowledges that Labour has a bold economic narrative - "that Britain needs fundamental change in its market structure and culture to compete in the modern world." But he is clear that far more detail is needed for the party to convince voters that it represents a credible alternative to the coalition. In a significant overture to the Liberal Democrats, he suggests that the party should take Vince Cable's 2012 Budget submission to George Osborne, lamenting the lack of a "compelling vision" beyond austerity, and "promise to implement it." It is a statement that some in Labour will see as a snub to the shadow chancellor, Ed Balls, who has set out his own five-point plan for growth.

Rather than simply renew commitments to "tax and spend", Miliband writes, Labour needs to make "switch spends". He highlights a proposal by IPPR, the think-tank where he worked before becoming Tony Blair's Head of Policy, to use a ten-year freeze on child benefit to pay for universal affordable childcare. It is a call for Labour to move beyond the dualistic approach of either supporting or opposing the coalition's cuts.

Miliband's fear is that Labour will "confuse being a better opposition with becoming a potential government". His praise for Jon Cruddas, the MP now leading the party's policy review, who Miliband notes is "not a policy wonk - a great advantage", is a sign that he believes Labour will avoid this trap. But his closing assertion that the Labour "cannot be conservative" is a warning to his brother not to appease the party's status quo faction.

David Miliband warns against "defensive social democracy" in his leader in this week's New Statesman. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty Images.
Show Hide image

Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.