Tory Lords rebels: the full list

The 91 Tory MPs who voted against the House of Lords reform bill.

1. Adam Afriyie

2. David Amess

3. Steve Baker

4. John Baron

5. Guto Bebb

6. Andrew Bingham

7. Brian Binley

8. Bob Blackman

9. Nicola Blackwood

10. Peter Bone (Teller)

11. Graham Brady

12. Angie Bray

13. Julian Brazier

14. Andrew Bridgen

15. Steve Brine

16. Conor Burns

17. Dan Byles

18. Alun Cairns

19. Bill Cash

20. Christopher Chope

21. James Clappison

22. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown

23. Geoffrey Cox

24. Tracey Crouch

25. Philip Davies

26. David Davis

27. Nick De Bois

28. Caroline Dinenage

29. Nadine Dorries

30. Richard Drax

31. George Eustice

32. Mike Freer

33. Richard Fuller

34. Zac Goldsmith

35. James Gray

36. Andew Griffiths

37. Richard Harrington

38. Simon Hart

39. Sir Alan Haselhurst

40. Philip Hollobone

41. Adam Holloway

42. Stewart Jackson

43. Bernard Jenkin

44. Gareth Johnson

45. Chris Kelly

46. Eleanor Laing

47. Dr Phillip Lee

48. Edward Leigh

49. Charlotte Leslie

50. Dr Julian Lewis

51. Ian Liddell-Grainger

52. Peter Lilley

53. Jonathan Lord

54. Karen Lumley

55. Jason McCartney

56. Karl McCartney

57. Anne McIntosh

58. Anne Main

59. Louise Mensch

60. Patrick Mercer

61. Penny Mordaunt

62. James Morris

63. Jesse Norman

64. David Nuttall

65. Matthew Offord

66. Mark Pawsey

67. Andrew Percy

68. Christopher Pincher

69. John Redwood

70. Jacob Rees Mogg

71. Simon Reevel

72. Sir Malcolm Rifkind

73. Laurence Robertson

74. Andrew Rossindell

75. David Ruffley

76. Richard Shepherd

77. Nicholas Soames

78. Bob Stewart

79. Rory Stewart

80. Gary Streeter

81. Graham Stuart

82. Sir Peter Tapsell

83. David Tredinnick

84. Andrew Tyrie

85. Charles Walker

86. Robin Walker

87. Robert Walter

88. Chris White

89. Craig Whittaker (Teller)

90. John Whittingdale

91. Nadhim Zahawi

Louise Mensch was one of 91 Conservative MPs to vote against the House of Lords reform bill. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

Theresa May’s stage-managed election campaign keeps the public at bay

Jeremy Corbyn’s approach may be chaotic, but at least it’s more authentic.

The worst part about running an election campaign for a politician? Having to meet the general public. Those ordinary folk can be a tricky lot, with their lack of regard for being on-message, and their pesky real-life concerns.

But it looks like Theresa May has decided to avoid this inconvenience altogether during this snap general election campaign, as it turns out her visit to Leeds last night was so stage-managed that she barely had to face the public.

Accusations have been whizzing around online that at a campaign event at the Shine building in Leeds, the Prime Minister spoke to a room full of guests invited by the party, rather than local people or people who work in the building’s office space.

The Telegraph’s Chris Hope tweeted a picture of the room in which May was addressing her audience yesterday evening a little before 7pm. He pointed out that, being in Leeds, she was in “Labour territory”:

But a few locals who spied this picture online claimed that the audience did not look like who you’d expect to see congregated at Shine – a grade II-listed Victorian school that has been renovated into a community project housing office space and meeting rooms.

“Ask why she didn’t meet any of the people at the business who work in that beautiful building. Everyone there was an invite-only Tory,” tweeted Rik Kendell, a Leeds-based developer and designer who says he works in the Shine building. “She didn’t arrive until we’d all left for the day. Everyone in the building past 6pm was invite-only . . . They seemed to seek out the most clinical corner for their PR photos. Such a beautiful building to work in.”

Other tweeters also found the snapshot jarring:

Shine’s founders have pointed out that they didn’t host or invite Theresa May – rather the party hired out the space for a private event: “All visitors pay for meeting space in Shine and we do not seek out, bid for, or otherwise host any political parties,” wrote managing director Dawn O'Keefe. The guestlist was not down to Shine, but to the Tory party.

The audience consisted of journalists and around 150 Tory activists, according to the Guardian. This was instead of employees from the 16 offices housed in the building. I have asked the Conservative Party for clarification of who was in the audience and whether it was invite-only and am awaiting its response.

Jeremy Corbyn accused May of “hiding from the public”, and local Labour MP Richard Burgon commented that, “like a medieval monarch, she simply briefly relocated her travelling court of admirers to town and then moved on without so much as a nod to the people she considers to be her lowly subjects”.

But it doesn’t look like the Tories’ painstaking stage-management is a fool-proof plan. Having uniform audiences of the party faithful on the campaign trail seems to be confusing the Prime Minister somewhat. During a visit to a (rather sparsely populated) factory in Clay Cross, Derbyshire, yesterday, she appeared to forget where exactly on the campaign trail she was:

The management of Corbyn’s campaign has also resulted in gaffes – but for opposite reasons. A slightly more chaotic approach has led to him facing the wrong way, with his back to the cameras.

Corbyn’s blunder is born out of his instinct to address the crowd rather than the cameras – May’s problem is the other way round. Both, however, seem far more comfortable talking to the party faithful, even if they are venturing out of safe seat territory.

Anoosh Chakelian is senior writer at the New Statesman.

0800 7318496