Tory Lords rebels: the full list

The 91 Tory MPs who voted against the House of Lords reform bill.

1. Adam Afriyie

2. David Amess

3. Steve Baker

4. John Baron

5. Guto Bebb

6. Andrew Bingham

7. Brian Binley

8. Bob Blackman

9. Nicola Blackwood

10. Peter Bone (Teller)

11. Graham Brady

12. Angie Bray

13. Julian Brazier

14. Andrew Bridgen

15. Steve Brine

16. Conor Burns

17. Dan Byles

18. Alun Cairns

19. Bill Cash

20. Christopher Chope

21. James Clappison

22. Geoffrey Clifton-Brown

23. Geoffrey Cox

24. Tracey Crouch

25. Philip Davies

26. David Davis

27. Nick De Bois

28. Caroline Dinenage

29. Nadine Dorries

30. Richard Drax

31. George Eustice

32. Mike Freer

33. Richard Fuller

34. Zac Goldsmith

35. James Gray

36. Andew Griffiths

37. Richard Harrington

38. Simon Hart

39. Sir Alan Haselhurst

40. Philip Hollobone

41. Adam Holloway

42. Stewart Jackson

43. Bernard Jenkin

44. Gareth Johnson

45. Chris Kelly

46. Eleanor Laing

47. Dr Phillip Lee

48. Edward Leigh

49. Charlotte Leslie

50. Dr Julian Lewis

51. Ian Liddell-Grainger

52. Peter Lilley

53. Jonathan Lord

54. Karen Lumley

55. Jason McCartney

56. Karl McCartney

57. Anne McIntosh

58. Anne Main

59. Louise Mensch

60. Patrick Mercer

61. Penny Mordaunt

62. James Morris

63. Jesse Norman

64. David Nuttall

65. Matthew Offord

66. Mark Pawsey

67. Andrew Percy

68. Christopher Pincher

69. John Redwood

70. Jacob Rees Mogg

71. Simon Reevel

72. Sir Malcolm Rifkind

73. Laurence Robertson

74. Andrew Rossindell

75. David Ruffley

76. Richard Shepherd

77. Nicholas Soames

78. Bob Stewart

79. Rory Stewart

80. Gary Streeter

81. Graham Stuart

82. Sir Peter Tapsell

83. David Tredinnick

84. Andrew Tyrie

85. Charles Walker

86. Robin Walker

87. Robert Walter

88. Chris White

89. Craig Whittaker (Teller)

90. John Whittingdale

91. Nadhim Zahawi

Louise Mensch was one of 91 Conservative MPs to vote against the House of Lords reform bill. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty Images.
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Is anyone prepared to solve the NHS funding crisis?

As long as the political taboo on raising taxes endures, the service will be in financial peril. 

It has long been clear that the NHS is in financial ill-health. But today's figures, conveniently delayed until after the Conservative conference, are still stunningly bad. The service ran a deficit of £930m between April and June (greater than the £820m recorded for the whole of the 2014/15 financial year) and is on course for a shortfall of at least £2bn this year - its worst position for a generation. 

Though often described as having been shielded from austerity, owing to its ring-fenced budget, the NHS is enduring the toughest spending settlement in its history. Since 1950, health spending has grown at an average annual rate of 4 per cent, but over the last parliament it rose by just 0.5 per cent. An ageing population, rising treatment costs and the social care crisis all mean that the NHS has to run merely to stand still. The Tories have pledged to provide £10bn more for the service but this still leaves £20bn of efficiency savings required. 

Speculation is now turning to whether George Osborne will provide an emergency injection of funds in the Autumn Statement on 25 November. But the long-term question is whether anyone is prepared to offer a sustainable solution to the crisis. Health experts argue that only a rise in general taxation (income tax, VAT, national insurance), patient charges or a hypothecated "health tax" will secure the future of a universal, high-quality service. But the political taboo against increasing taxes on all but the richest means no politician has ventured into this territory. Shadow health secretary Heidi Alexander has today called for the government to "find money urgently to get through the coming winter months". But the bigger question is whether, under Jeremy Corbyn, Labour is prepared to go beyond sticking-plaster solutions. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.