Tory demand for an Osborne apology is growing

Tory MP Andrea Leadsom says the Chancellor "should apologise" for his attack on Balls.

The increasingly impressive Conservative MP Andrea Leadsom won't have done her career prospects any good with her call for George Osborne to "apologise" to Ed Balls but she has won the respect of Labour MPs as well as a sizeable number of Tories.

Asked by Radio 4's The World Tonight whether Osborne should apologise to Balls after Bank of England deputy governor Paul Tucker said no ministers asked him to "lean on" Barclays over Libor rates, Leadsom said:

Yes I do. I mean I think obviously he made a mistake and I think he should apologise.

She added:

I think it was a very valid discussion at the time about who knew what and that's now been completely squashed by Paul Tucker and that is a valid conversation to have had, and now at a personal level he probably would want to apologise.

But Osborne and his aides are refusing to back down. A friend of the Chancellor tells the Telegraph's James Kirkup that Osborne's suggestion was never that Labour ministers had lent on the Bank of England, rather that they had influenced the banks directly. That may or may not be the case, but one notes that Osborne has yet to supply any evidence to support his account. Nor has he even laid out the alleged "questions" Balls needs to answer.  As one Tory MP observed last week, "Before we went into the chamber on Thursday, George's people were saying 'Nudge, nudge, wink, wink. George is going to get Ed Balls'. They were indicating that there was a silver bullet that was going to kill him. It was never fired.

Challenged on the Today programme to defend Osborne, William Hague insisted that "there remain questions to answer" and that there was "no reason" for him to apologise. But as the Foreign Secretary's voice quivered one could tell his heart wasn't in it. Osborne's dramatic assertion that Labour ministers were "clearly involved" in the rate-rigging scandal has become the banal claim that they have "questions" to answer at the forthcoming parliamentary inquiry. Whether or not the Chancellor apologises, he has blinked first in this duel.

Chancellor George Osborne is facing calls to apologise to Ed Balls. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Zac Goldsmith to quit as Tory MP after Heathrow decision announced

The environmentalist is expected to stand as an independent candidate.

Zac Goldsmith, the MP for Richmond Park and North Kingston, and a committed environmentalist, has announced his resignation after the government backed a third runway at Heathrow. 

He has told his local Conservative association of the decision, according to The Huffington Post. The group has reportedly agreed to back him as an independent in a by-election.

Goldsmith tweeted: "Following the Government's catastrophic Heathrow announcement, I will be meeting my constituents later today before making a statement."

Goldsmith had previously pledged to resign if the government went ahead with the decision. By quitting, he will trigger a by-election, in which he is expected to stand as an independent candidate. 

Speaking in the Commons, he said the project was "doomed" and would be a "millstone" around the government's neck. He said: "The complexities, the cost, the legal complications mean this project is almost certainly not going to be delivered."


However, there is no guarantee it is a by-election he will win. Here's Stephen Bush on why a Richmond Park and Kingston by-election could be good news for the Lib Dems.

After years of speculation, the government announced on Tuesday it was plumping for Heathrow instead of Gatwick. Transport secretary Chris Grayling called it a "momentous" decision.

The announcement will please business groups, but anger environmentalists, and MPs representing west London constituencies already affected by the noise pollution. 

In a recent post on his constituency website, Goldsmith highlighted the noise levels, the risk of flying so many planes over densely-populated areas, and the political fallout. He declared: "I promised voters I would step down and hold a by-election if Heathrow gets the go-ahead and I will stand by that pledge."

Once a Tory "nice boy" pin up, Goldsmith's reputation has suffered in the past year due to his campaigning tactics when he ran against Sadiq Khan for London mayor. Advised by strategist Lynton Crosby, Goldsmith tried to play on racial divisions and accused Khan of links to extremists. Despite enjoying support from London's Evening Standard, he lost.

The former mayor of London, Boris Johnson, once declared he would lie down "in front of those bulldozers" but has toned down his objections since becoming foreign secretary.

Green MP Caroline Lucas urged him to follow Goldsmith and resign, so he could team up with her in opposing the extension at Heathrow.

Labour, in contrast, has welcomed the decision. The shadow Transport secretary Andy McDonald said: “We welcome any decision that will finally give certainty on airport expansion, much needed in terms of investment and growth in our country." He urged the government to provide more detail on the proposals.

But London's Labour mayor Sadiq Khan accused the government of "running roughshod" over Londoners' views. He said: "Heathrow expansion is the wrong decision for London, and the wrong decision for the whole of Britain."

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.