Bob Diamond's resignation is a victory for Ed Miliband

Once again, the Labour leader set the political pace.

Bob Diamond's resignation, announced this morning by Barclays, is a significant victory for Ed Miliband. Alone among senior politicians, the Labour leader called for the Barclays chief executive to resign the day after the Libor scandal broke (a call he repeated yesterday), with David Cameron merely stating that he had "serious questions to answer".

"It is not for prime ministers to hire and fire bank chiefs," said Cameron. "He has to make himself accountable to his shareholders and this House. He has some serious questions to answer." As in the case of the phone hacking-scandal (when he called for Rebekah Brooks's resignation and the abandonment of the BSkyB bid) and Stephen Hester's bonus, Miliband set the political pace. Even Vince Cable, who might have been expected to call for Diamond's resignation, suggested that it was up to Barclays shareholders to remove him. But in his resignation statement, it was "external pressure" (Miliband, in other words) that Diamond blamed.

One indicator of how seriously the Barclays boss took the Labour leader's opinion is that he called him last Thursday in an attempt to give his "side of the story" (as Miliband put it). Miliband was initially unsure whether to call for Diamond to go, preferring to focus on the sins of the banking system, rather than one individual, but he eventually resolved that Barclays needed new leadership. At this point, Diamond probably knew that his time was up.

Update: Miliband has responded to Diamond's resignation, stating that it was "necessary and right", while repeating his call for a juidical inquiry into the banks. Here's the statement in full:

This was necessary and right.

It was clear Bob Diamond was not the man to lead the change that Barclays needed.

But this is about more than one man.

This is about the culture and practices of the entire banking system which is why we need an independent, open, judge-led, public inquiry.

Bob Diamond resigned as chief executive of Barclays this morning. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty Images.
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Tory Brexiter Daniel Hannan: Leave campaign never promised "radical decline" in immigration

The voters might not agree...

BBC Newsnight on Twitter

It was the Leave campaign's pledge to reduce EU immigration that won it the referendum. But Daniel Hannan struck a rather different tone on last night's Newsnight. "It means free movement of labour," the Conservative MEP said of the post-Brexit model he envisaged. An exasperated Evan Davis replied: “I’m sorry we’ve just been through three months of agony on the issue of immigration. The public have been led to believe that what they have voted for is an end to free movement." 

Hannan protested that EU migrants would lose "legal entitlements to live in other countries, to vote in other countries and to claim welfare and to have the same university tuition". But Davis wasn't backing down. "Why didn't you say this in the campaign? Why didn't you say in the campaign that you were wanting a scheme where we have free movement of labour? Come on, that's completely at odds with what the public think they have just voted for." 

Hannan concluded: "We never said there was going to be some radical decline ... we want a measure of control". Your Mole suspects many voters assumed otherwise. If immigration is barely changed, Hannan and others will soon be burned by the very fires they stoked. 

I'm a mole, innit.