Will Osborne now appear before the Leveson inquiry?

Chancellor likely to be summoned this month.

In total, seven government ministers will appear before the Leveson inquiry. Vince Cable, Ken Clarke, Michael Gove, Jeremy Hunt and Theresa May have already done so, with David Cameron and Nick Clegg set to follow them later this month. Yet, absurdly, George Osborne, the man who recruited Andy Coulson, who met Murdoch executives 16 times following the general election and who, in the words of Rebekah Brooks, expressed "total bafflement" at Ofcom's response to the BSkyB bid, is currently not scheduled to appear. The Chancellor will merely be required to submit a witness statement.

One of the questions following Jeremy Hunt's appearance is whether this will now change. The texts exchanged between him and Osborne suggest that the Chancellor, as David Cameron's chief strategist (Osborne's dual role goes some way to explaining his botched Budget), played a decisive role in the handling of the BSkyB bid. It was to Osborne, who some might have imagined to be preoccupied with the task of running the British economy, that Hunt addressed his fear that "we are going to screw this up". He later added: "Just been called by James M. His lawyers are meeting now and saying it calls into question legitimacy of whole process from beginning 'acute bias' etc". To which Osborne infamously replied: "I hope you like the solution!" The solution being to hand Hunt, a cheerleader for the Murdochs (the most egregious example being the congratulatory text to James Murdoch, in which he declared: "Only Ofcom to go!"), ministerial responsibility for the BSkyB bid. The exchanges between Murdoch and Hunt, and Hunt and Osborne, raise the possibility that Murdoch and Osborne communicated on 21 December, perhaps minutes before Osborne's text to Hunt.

Fortunately, it now seems likely that the Chancellor will be forced to appear in person and that his own texts and emails with News Corp will be published. Today's Daily Mail reports that the Osborne "will be summoned alongside David Cameron, who is expected to give evidence on June 14." If so, his appearance could provide some of the most damaging revelations yet.

 

Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne exchanged texts with Jeremy Hunt on the BSkyB bid. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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To stop Jeremy Corbyn, I am giving my second preference to Andy Burnham

The big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Voting is now underway in the Labour leadership election. There can be no doubt that Jeremy Corbyn is the frontrunner, but the race isn't over yet.

I know from conversations across the country that many voters still haven't made up their mind.

Some are drawn to Jeremy's promises of a new Jerusalem and endless spending, but worried that these endless promises, with no credibility, will only serve to lose us the next general election.

Others are certain that a Jeremy victory is really a win for Cameron and Osborne, but don't know who is the best alternative to vote for.

I am supporting Liz Kendall and will give her my first preference. But polling data is brutally clear: the big question is whether Andy Burnham or Yvette Cooper will face Jeremy in the final round of this election.

Andy can win. He can draw together support from across the party, motivated by his history of loyalty to the Labour movement, his passionate appeal for unity in fighting the Tories, and the findings of every poll of the general public in this campaign that he is best placed candidate to win the next general election.

Yvette, in contrast, would lose to Jeremy Corbyn and lose heavily. Evidence from data collected by all the campaigns – except (apparently) Yvette's own – shows this. All publicly available polling shows the same. If Andy drops out of the race, a large part of the broad coalition he attracts will vote for Jeremy. If Yvette is knocked out, her support firmly swings behind Andy.

We will all have our views about the different candidates, but the real choice for our country is between a Labour government and the ongoing rightwing agenda of the Tories.

I am in politics to make a real difference to the lives of my constituents. We are all in the Labour movement to get behind the beliefs that unite all in our party.

In the crucial choice we are making right now, I have no doubt that a vote for Jeremy would be the wrong choice – throwing away the next election, and with it hope for the next decade.

A vote for Yvette gets the same result – her defeat by Jeremy, and Jeremy's defeat to Cameron and Osborne.

In the crucial choice between Yvette and Andy, Andy will get my second preference so we can have the best hope of keeping the fight for our party alive, and the best hope for the future of our country too.

Tom Blenkinsop is the Labour MP for Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland