The Barclays scandal is a chance for Miliband to show leadership

The Labour leader most move swiftly to articulate public anger.

The time for "remorse" is over, Barclays chief executive Bob Diamond told MPs in January 2011. It turns out it wasn't. The revelation that Barclays repeatedly manipulated interest rates in a bid to increase its profits means that there is much remorse to come. The latest corporate scandal, combined with the ongoing crisis at the RBS-owned Natwest, should make banker-bashing an Olympic sport among politicians.

Labour has rightly called for a criminal investigation into Barclays, with former city minister Paul Myners accurately observing on Newsnight: "This behaviour will only change if people face the prospect of criminal charges." The sense, however, is that most in Westminster are waiting to see how many others banks are implicated - Lloyds and RBS are both under investigation - before showing their hand. With the exception of the Lib Dems' Matthew Oakeshott, Vince Cable's representative on earth, no senior politician has called for Diamond to resign.

Soon, however, the voters will be demanding answers. On tonight's Question Time, you can expect the audience to ask two questions: "why has no one resigned?" and "why hasn't a single banker gone to jail?" The mere announcement that Diamond, presciently described by Peter Mandelson several years ago as the "unacceptable face of banking", and other top executives will not accept bonuses this year (while retaining handsome basic salaries) will do nothing to sate public outrage. And rightly so. As Labour's Chuka Umunna notes on Twitter, "LIBOR is used to calculate interest rates for SME loans, student loans, credit cards etc - manipulation of it would affect most people".

So here is another opportunity for Ed Miliband to show political leadership as he did during the phone-hacking scandal and the row over Stephen Hester's bonus. On such occasions, where Miliband has led, Cameron has followed. If he is to set the political pace again, Miliband should use his speech to Unite's conference to call for Diamond to resign and for a criminal investigation into Barclays. 

Update: As I predicted, Miliband used his speech at Unite's conference to call for "criminal prosecutions" against anyone at Barclays who broke the law, although he did not call for Diamond to consider his position. See my post here for the full quote.

Barclays chief executive Bob Diamond has resisted calls for his resignation. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Theresa May knows she's talking nonsense - here's why she's doing it

The Prime Minister's argument increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in her words - the Tories your vote.

Good morning.  Angela Merkel and Theresa May are more similar politicians than people think, and that holds true for Brexit too. The German Chancellor gave a speech yesterday, and the message: Brexit means Brexit.

Of course, the emphasis is slightly different. When May says it, it's about reassuring the Brexit elite in SW1 that she isn't going to backslide, and anxious Remainers and soft Brexiteers in the country that it will work out okay in the end.

When Merkel says it, she's setting out what the EU wants and the reality of third country status outside the European Union.  She's also, as with May, tilting to her own party and public opinion in Germany, which thinks that the UK was an awkward partner in the EU and is being even more awkward in the manner of its leaving.

It's a measure of how poor the debate both during the referendum and its aftermath is that Merkel's bland statement of reality - "A third-party state - and that's what Britain will be - can't and won't be able to have the same rights, let alone a better position than a member of the European Union" - feels newsworthy.

In the short term, all this helps Theresa May. Her response - delivered to a carefully-selected audience of Leeds factory workers, the better to avoid awkward questions - that the EU is "ganging up" on Britain is ludicrous if you think about it. A bloc of nations acting in their own interest against their smaller partners - colour me surprised!

But in terms of what May wants out of this election - a massive majority that gives her carte blanche to implement her agenda and puts Labour out of contention for at least a decade - it's a great message. It increases the sense that this is a time to "lend" - in May's words - the Tories your vote. You may be unhappy about the referendum result, you may usually vote Labour - but on this occasion, what's needed is a one-off Tory vote to make Brexit a success.

May's message is silly if you pay any attention to how the EU works or indeed to the internal politics of the EU27. That doesn't mean it won't be effective.

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to British politics.

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