The Queen's speech: bill-by-bill

The 19 coalition bills announced today in the Queen's speech.

There were 19 bills announced in the Queen's seven-minute speech to parliament, here they are for Staggers readers.

Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill

Legislation to repeal unnecessary laws and to limit state inspection of businesses.

Banking Reform Bill

Measures to strengthen regulation of the financial services sector.

Implementation of the recommendations of the Independent Commission on Banking (otherwise known as the Vickers report).

Groceries Adjudicator Bill

The establishment of an independent adjudicator to ensure supermarkets deal fairly and lawfully with suppliers.

Small Donations Bill

A bill to allow charities to claim additional payments on small donations.

Energy Bill

Reform of the electricity market to deliver "secure, clean and affordable electricity" and ensure prices are fair.

Draft Water Bill

Reform of the water industry in England and Wales.

Public Service Pensions Bill

Public service pensions will be reformed in line with the recommendations of the independent commission on public service pensions (otherwise known as the Hutton report).

Draft Local Audit Bill

Abolishes the Audit Commission and establishes new arrangements for the audit of local public bodies.

Children and Families Bill

Includes measures to improve provision for disabled children and children with special educational needs, reform of family courts and more flexible parental leave for parents.

Draft Care and Support Bill

A bill to modernise adult care and support in England.

Electoral registration and Administration Bill

Introduces individual registration of voters.

House of Lords reform bill

A bill to reform "the composition" of the House of Lords. This was more tightly-worded than expected.

Crime and Courts Bill

Establishes a National Crime Agency to tackle the most serious and organised crime and strengthen border security.

Defamation Bill

New measures to protect freedom of speech and reform defamation law.

Justice and Security Bill

Will allow secret courts to hear a greater range of evidence in national security cases.

Draft Communications Bill

Legislation to allow the police and intelligence agencies to collect data on communications, such as texts and emails.

European Union (Approval of Treaty Amendment Decision) Bill

Approves the creation of the financial stability mechanism within the euro area.

Croatia Accession Bill

The government will seek parliamentary approval on the anticipated accession of Croatia to the EU.

International Aid

There was no international development bill in the speech (as Richard Darlington predicted on The Staggers last month) but the government reaffirmed its commitment to spend 0.7 per cent of gross national income on international aid from 2013.

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, proceed through the Royal Gallery in the Palace of Westminster, home to the Houses of Parliament. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Photo: Getty
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What Jeremy Corbyn gets right about the single market

Technically, you can be outside the EU but inside the single market. Philosophically, you're still in the EU. 

I’ve been trying to work out what bothers me about the response to Jeremy Corbyn’s interview on the Andrew Marr programme.

What bothers me about Corbyn’s interview is obvious: the use of the phrase “wholesale importation” to describe people coming from Eastern Europe to the United Kingdom makes them sound like boxes of sugar rather than people. Adding to that, by suggesting that this “importation” had “destroy[ed] conditions”, rather than laying the blame on Britain’s under-enforced and under-regulated labour market, his words were more appropriate to a politician who believes that immigrants are objects to be scapegoated, not people to be served. (Though perhaps that is appropriate for the leader of the Labour Party if recent history is any guide.)

But I’m bothered, too, by the reaction to another part of his interview, in which the Labour leader said that Britain must leave the single market as it leaves the European Union. The response to this, which is technically correct, has been to attack Corbyn as Liechtenstein, Switzerland, Norway and Iceland are members of the single market but not the European Union.

In my view, leaving the single market will make Britain poorer in the short and long term, will immediately render much of Labour’s 2017 manifesto moot and will, in the long run, be a far bigger victory for right-wing politics than any mere election. Corbyn’s view, that the benefits of freeing a British government from the rules of the single market will outweigh the costs, doesn’t seem very likely to me. So why do I feel so uneasy about the claim that you can be a member of the single market and not the European Union?

I think it’s because the difficult truth is that these countries are, de facto, in the European Union in any meaningful sense. By any estimation, the three pillars of Britain’s “Out” vote were, firstly, control over Britain’s borders, aka the end of the free movement of people, secondly, more money for the public realm aka £350m a week for the NHS, and thirdly control over Britain’s own laws. It’s hard to see how, if the United Kingdom continues to be subject to the free movement of people, continues to pay large sums towards the European Union, and continues to have its laws set elsewhere, we have “honoured the referendum result”.

None of which changes my view that leaving the single market would be a catastrophe for the United Kingdom. But retaining Britain’s single market membership starts with making the argument for single market membership, not hiding behind rhetorical tricks about whether or not single market membership was on the ballot last June, when it quite clearly was. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. His daily briefing, Morning Call, provides a quick and essential guide to domestic and global politics.