Peter Hain confirms shadow cabinet exit

What does this mean for Labour's frontbench?

After rumours over the weekend and before, Peter Hain has confirmed that he will step down at shadow Welsh secretary. In a letter to the Labour leader, Ed Miliband, the 62 year old said he plans to stay on as an MP, fighting Neath again at the next election.

The veteran MP, who informed Miliband of his plan to step down before Christmas, stayed in his post to contest this month’s local elections. He wrote that the “thumping victory” in Wales provided a good opportunity to step aside.

Hain, who served as a cabinet minister under both Tony Blair and Gordon Brown, said that he would not rule out a return to frontbench politics if offered something in the future. For now, he plans to campaign for the building of a Severn barrage.

What does this mean for Labour? The frontrunners to replace Hain are Owen Smith, Pontypridd MP and shadow treasury minister, Cardiff West MP Kevin Brennan, and Chris Bryant, MP for Rhonda.

Speculation is rife that Miliband could use this as the chance for a wider reshuffle of his frontbench. In today’s Guardian, Jackie Ashley discusses the possibilities:

Like Cameron, his big hitters are likely to stay where they are, though there will always be a yearning on the Blairite wing for his brother David to return to the top table. This would hugely strengthen the Labour team and would be worth the gossip and tension it might bring. Miliband could hardly move Ed Balls to make way for his brother, just as Balls feels he is starting to get a proper hearing for his growth policies, as Europe shifts daily. But if Miliband does want to shuffle his top players, then his brother at either health or education, or even home affairs or foreign affairs, would be good news.

That's up to David and his demons. It would make it easier for Ed Miliband to move another Blairite, Liam Byrne, who though bright and capable has irritated many in the party by looking too close to the Iain Duncan Smith welfare agenda, and whose enthusiasm to run in the now not happening Birmingham mayoral race suggests he isn't enjoying life in Planet Ed. Of the Labour successes, Chris Bryant and Kevin Brennan look near certs for promotion. The three best female newcomers – Rachel Reeves, Liz Kendall and Stella Creasy – could all do with an even higher profile.

How far Miliband chooses to go with the reshuffle remains to be seen -- and a return to the frontbench for David Miliband still seems unlikely. But regardless of Miliband family politics, this is a chance for the Labour leader to capitalise on recent successes in the polls (and recent Tory failings) with a reinvigorated team.

Peter Hain. Photograph: Getty Images

Samira Shackle is a freelance journalist, who tweets @samirashackle. She was formerly a staff writer for the New Statesman.

Grant Shapps on the campaign trail. Photo: Getty
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Grant Shapps resigns over Tory youth wing bullying scandal

The minister, formerly party chairman, has resigned over allegations of bullying and blackmail made against a Tory activist. 

Grant Shapps, who was a key figure in the Tory general election campaign, has resigned following allegations about a bullying scandal among Conservative activists.

Shapps was formerly party chairman, but was demoted to international development minister after May. His formal statement is expected shortly.

The resignation follows lurid claims about bullying and blackmail among Tory activists. One, Mark Clarke, has been accused of putting pressure on a fellow activist who complained about his behaviour to withdraw the allegation. The complainant, Elliot Johnson, later killed himself.

The junior Treasury minister Robert Halfon also revealed that he had an affair with a young activist after being warned that Clarke planned to blackmail him over the relationship. Former Tory chair Sayeedi Warsi says that she was targeted by Clarke on Twitter, where he tried to portray her as an anti-semite. 

Shapps appointed Mark Clarke to run RoadTrip 2015, where young Tory activists toured key marginals on a bus before the general election. 

Today, the Guardian published an emotional interview with the parents of 21-year-old Elliot Johnson, the activist who killed himself, in which they called for Shapps to consider his position. Ray Johnson also spoke to BBC's Newsnight:


The Johnson family claimed that Shapps and co-chair Andrew Feldman had failed to act on complaints made against Clarke. Feldman says he did not hear of the bullying claims until August. 

Asked about the case at a conference in Malta, David Cameron pointedly refused to offer Shapps his full backing, saying a statement would be released. “I think it is important that on the tragic case that took place that the coroner’s inquiry is allowed to proceed properly," he added. “I feel deeply for his parents, It is an appalling loss to suffer and that is why it is so important there is a proper coroner’s inquiry. In terms of what the Conservative party should do, there should be and there is a proper inquiry that asks all the questions as people come forward. That will take place. It is a tragic loss of a talented young life and it is not something any parent should go through and I feel for them deeply.” 

Mark Clarke denies any wrongdoing.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.