Cameron texted Rebekah Brooks "a dozen" times a day

The PM's text exchanges with Brooks could soon be published.

Peter Oborne's excoriating column on the Tories and the Murdochs in today's Telegraph includes the revelation that David Cameron texted former News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks at least 12 times a day. Oborne writes:

A fresh embarrassment concerns Rebekah Brooks, who providentially retained the text messages she received from the Prime Minister, which I’m told could exceed a dozen a day. These may now be published, a horrible thought.

If true, it evidences why David Cameron's upcoming appearance at the Leveson inquiry (he will likely appear in mid-June) could prove so embarrassing for the Prime Minister. Indeed, last week's Sunday Times (£) reported that Brooks is "ready to disclose any text messages and emails between herself and David Cameron if required." (Cameron reportedly signed letters to her "Love, David".)

It's easy to see how the news  of Cameron's daily contact with the striking Brooks (Tweeters are already quipping about her being his "Monica Lewinsky") could permanently reduce him in the eyes of the public.

David Cameron with former Sun editor and News International chief executive Rebekah Brooks.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

Donald Trump is definitely the Republican presidential candidate

Previously unpledged delegates have revealed their support for the billionaire, taking him past the delegate tally required.

Donald Trump has attained the number of delegates required to become the Republican Party’s presidential nominee. According to Associated Press, Trump has reached 1,238 delegates, one more than needed to secure his place as the Republican candidate in November’s general election.

Trump has been the presumptive Republican nominee since early May, when his last remaining rivals Ted Cruz and John Kasich suspended their campaigns. Still, with five primaries still to come and some delegates not required to reveal their preference until the Republican national convention in July, Trump was not quite over the line.

Associated Press has calculated that Trump is in fact now secure as nominee after speaking to previously unpledged delegates who revealed their support for the bombastic billionaire. Trump, whose candidacy was initially seen as a publicity stunt, has so far come top in 34 of the primary and caucus contests.  

On the Democratic side, Bernie Sanders has vowed to continue to pursue the party’s presidential nomination to the party’s convention, where delegates are officially allocated and the party’s candidate declared. However, Sanders currently has the support of just 1,539 delegates compared to Hillary Clinton’s 2,305, with 2,383 needed for the nomination. 

Henry Zeffman writes about politics and is the winner of the Anthony Howard Award 2015.