Prevention is better than cure

The ongoing struggle to reduce the cost of vaccines in developing countries like Ghana.

 

Monday saw me in Committee room 1 in Westminster amongst Parliamentarians and health and development activists at the start of World Immunisation Week. Now I am in Ghana where more than 50 years ago I was inoculated against polio. This has now been eradicated in Ghana by the sort of mass immunisation campaign that I am privileged to see launched here this week.

Today, in Ghana the target is two of the biggest child killers in the world pneumonia and diarrhoea. These two diseases account for an estimated 20 per cent of all under 5 deaths in the country, but are largely preventable through the introduction of the pneumococcal and rotavirus vaccines. In the UK we take for granted the access and availability of these vaccines and we have little experience of the fatal impact of these diseases. But pneumonia and diarrhoea each kill roughly 500,000 children under 5 every year and 85 per cent of the diarrhoea deaths caused by rotavirus are in the developing world. In Ghana the fatal impact of these diseases is very real.

I am travelling to Ghana with the GAVI Alliance. This unique partnership between governments, North and South, civil society, and private sector philanthropists and businesses has revolutionised the market in and delivery of vaccines globally and saved the lives of millions. The origins of GAVI's funding lie in the very special coming together of activists and government that led to the UK’s historic commitments to the UN 0.7 per cent of GDP target for development. This is an enduring achievement of the last Labour government. The good news is that this saw the advent of a new national consensus. The consequence of which is that David Cameron and Andrew Mitchell, who hosted the last funding conference for GAVI, have committed a further £814 million pounds to the cause. This recognises not simply the need I see so clearly demonstrated in Ghana and indeed throughout my work in Africa but also of the effectiveness of GAVI and its unique model. This builds local ownership whilst intervening in world markets to reduce the cost of vaccines to developing nations through innovative funding mechanisms. The IFFIm on which I worked with Gordon Brown during our time at the Treasury was the first of these. Designed and championed by a very special partnership between the treasury, the city, and civil society including the Vatican, it proved to be a groundbreaking approach to securing sustainable funding for development. I am now seeing first hand in Ghana the product of a next generation initiative, the Advanced Market Commitment (AMC), which is delivering life saving pneumococcal vaccines to the poorest countries at a 90 per cent price reduction compared to the cost in the US and EU. And it has accelerated the pace of delivery so that by 2015 an additional 700,000 lives ought to be saved.

The child that I saw my self struggling for breath in the arms of her father, whilst a weeping mother looked on at the Princess Marie Louise Hospital in central Accra ought not to be joined by countless others. Politics and the budget process that protects DFID’s spending are too often disparaged by so many in the sadly cynical and disillusioned country that we have become. Not least by so many young people who have been turned off completely by the whole process. We all need reminding from time to time why politics and the contest of ideas and values matter so desperately. And why we need to restore and revitalise our own politics.

One of GAVI’s strengths, as I see it, is that GAVI builds and supports local ownership and participation. A traditional leader in rural Ghana told us through his linguist, the original version of our own Number 10 spokesperson, why he had called together the village community to get vaccinated. Ghanaian health professionals had proudly outlined the “cold chain”, the logistical triumph that will ensure that children in the remotest parts of Ghana will still get access to the vaccine in good time and at maximum effectiveness. The Health Minister rightly outlined the Ghanaian taxpayers’ contribution to the funding of the whole process supported by GAVI. This is best practice in international development. Britain’s contribution ensures that somewhere in the world every 2 seconds a child is being vaccinated and a life is saved every 2 minutes from diseases that no child in the UK ever dies. On my way back from the medical field unit so similar to the one my mum took me all those years ago now, I saw a “Tro-Tro”, Ghana’s ubiquitous minivan taxi system. They are famed for the proverbs emblazoned on them with great colour and decorative flourish. This one simply said, “Prevention is better than cure". 

Paul Boateng is a former chief secretary to the Treasury, ex-High Commissioner in South Africa and a Labour peer

Paul Boateng, a former British high commissioner to South Africa, MP, cabinet minister and civil rights lawyer, is a member of the House of Lords and a trustee of the Planet Earth Institute

Getty
Show Hide image

Donald Tusk is merely calling out Tory hypocrisy on Brexit

And the President of the European Council has the upper hand. 

The pair of numbers that have driven the discussion about our future relationship with the EU since the referendum have been 48 to 52. 

"The majority have spoken", cry the Leavers. "It’s time to tell the EU what we want and get out." However, even as they push for triggering the process early next year, the President of the European Council Donald Tusk’s reply to a letter from Tory MPs, where he blamed British voters for the uncertain futures of expats, is a long overdue reminder that another pair of numbers will, from now on, dominate proceedings.

27 to 1.

For all the media speculation around Brexit in the past few months, over what kind of deal the government will decide to be seek from any future relationship, it is incredible just how little time and thought has been given to the fact that once Article 50 is triggered, we will effectively be negotiating with 27 other partners, not just one.

Of course some countries hold more sway than others, due to their relative economic strength and population, but one of the great equalising achievements of the EU is that all of its member states have a voice. We need look no further than the last minute objections from just one federal entity within Belgium last month over CETA, the huge EU-Canada trade deal, to be reminded how difficult and important it is to build consensus.

Yet the Tories are failing spectacularly to understand this.

During his short trip to Strasbourg last week, David Davis at best ignored, and at worse angered, many of the people he will have to get on-side to secure a deal. Although he did meet Michel Barnier, the senior negotiator for the European Commission, and Guy Verhofstadt, the European Parliament’s representative at the future talks, he did not meet any representatives from the key Socialist Group in the European Parliament, nor the Parliament’s President, nor the Chair of its Constitutional Committee which will advise the Parliament on whether to ratify any future Brexit deal.

In parallel, Boris Johnson, to nobody’s surprise any more, continues to blunder from one debacle to the next, the most recent of which was to insult the Italians with glib remarks about prosecco sales.

On his side, Liam Fox caused astonishment by claiming that the EU would have to pay compensation to third countries across the world with which it has trade deals, to compensate them for Britain no longer being part of the EU with which they had signed their agreements!

And now, Theresa May has been embarrassingly rebuffed in her clumsy attempt to strike an early deal directly with Angela Merkel over the future residential status of EU citizens living and working in Britain and UK citizens in Europe. 

When May was campaigning to be Conservative party leader and thus PM, to appeal to the anti-european Tories, she argued that the future status of EU citizens would have to be part of the ongoing negotiations with the EU. Why then, four months later, are Tory MPs so quick to complain and call foul when Merkel and Tusk take the same position as May held in July? 

Because Theresa May has reversed her position. Our EU partners’ position remains the same - no negotiations before Article 50 is triggered and Britain sets out its stall. Merkel has said she can’t and won’t strike a pre-emptive deal.  In any case, she cannot make agreements on behalf of France,Netherlands and Austria, all of who have their own imminent elections to consider, let alone any other EU member. 

The hypocrisy of Tory MPs calling on the European Commission and national governments to end "the anxiety and uncertainty for UK and EU citizens living in one another's territories", while at the same time having caused and fuelled that same anxiety and uncertainty, has been called out by Tusk. 

With such an astounding level of Tory hypocrisy, incompetence and inconsistency, is it any wonder that our future negotiating partners are rapidly losing any residual goodwill towards the UK?

It is beholden on Theresa May’s government to start showing some awareness of the scale of the enormous task ahead, if the UK is to have any hope of striking a Brexit deal that is anything less than disastrous for Britain. The way they are handling this relatively simple issue does not augur well for the far more complex issues, involving difficult choices for Britain, that are looming on the horizon.

Richard Corbett is the Labour MEP for Yorkshire & Humber.