Lib Dem MP calls for tax avoidance

Cornish MP Adrian Sanders argues for mass avoidance of pasty tax.

Three weeks on from the Budget, the row over the pasty tax rumbles on. Following yesterday's summit in Truro, Cornish MPs from all three parties are reportedly planning to form a coalition to prevent the measure passing through Parliament. Meanwhile, the Lib Dem MP for Torbay, Adrian Sanders, has openly called for traders to avoid the tax. He writes on his blog:

I think there’s a way round this if every business in Devon & Cornwall stopped selling hot pasties. Once the customer has paid for their cold pasty they hand it back to the shop and ask if they wouldn’t mind putting it in the microwave or in the oven for collection later!

The key is for the shop not to advertise such a service and for us – the pasty eating customers – to ensure we are all in on the secret.

It's a not-so-secret call for mass tax avoidance. Can we expect George Osborne, who has described "aggressive tax avoidance" as "morally repugnant" [even while rewarding it] to come down "like a ton of bricks" on Sanders?

Hat-tip: James Ball.

Lib Dem MP Adrian Sanders called for "every business" in Cornwall to stop selling hot pasties. Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

Getty
Show Hide image

Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

0800 7318496