Is this the end for Jeremy Hunt?

Culture Secretary under pressure after acting as a "cheerleader" for the BSkyB bid.

Jeremy Hunt is swiftly emerging as the cabinet minister with the most questions to answer following James Murdoch's testimony to the Leveson inquiry. Rupert Murdoch has submitted 163 pages of emails between News Corp lobbyist Frederic Michel and Hunt's special adviser to the inquiry, which suggest that the Culture Secretary, in the words of Robert Jay, QC, acted as a "cheerleader" for the BSkyB bid. Even before he acquired ministerial responsibility for the deal, Hunt received "strong legal advice" not to meet James Murdoch but, according to the emails, later offered to speak to him on the phone. In addition, through his special adviser, he allegedly communicated his personal support for the deal. On 15 June 2010, Hunt's special adviser reportedly told Michel, that he didn't believe there was a "media plurality issue" and that "the UK government would be supportive throughout the process".

In December, after Ofcom outlined its concerns over the bid, Michel claimed he had a "very good debrief with Hunt ... he is pretty amazed by its findings, methodology and clear bias. He very much shares our views on it."

With the full emails due to be published online after Murdoch's appearance ends at 4pm, worse is likely to come.

Hunt has never made any secret of his admiration for News Corp and Murdoch snr. In an interview with Broadcast magazine while shadow culture secretary, he argued:

Rather than worry about Rupert Murdoch owning another TV channel, what we should recognise is that he has probably done more to create variety and choice in British TV than any other single person because of his huge investment in setting up Sky TV which, at one point, was losing several million pounds a day.

We would be the poorer and wouldn't be saying that British TV is the envy of the world if it hadn't been for him being prepared to take that commercial risk. We need to encourage that kind of investment.

But given that he told MPs on 3 March that "at every stage of this process (the BSkyB deal) we have sought to be completely transparent, impartial and fair" the exchanges are deeply embarrassing and could even prove fatal. Indeed, Ladbrokes has just suspended betting on him being the next minister to leave the cabinet.

Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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France to bulldoze Calais Jungle days after child refugees arrive in the UK

The camp houses thousands. 

Refugees and migrants in Calais began queuing up for buses this morning as the French authorities plan to demolish the "Jungle" camp.

But activists fear that, unless France significantly speeds up its asylum process, the displaced people will simply move to other camps along the northern French coast.

Meanwhile, the first children of Calais brought to the UK under the Dubs Amendment arrived at the weekend.

The camp known as the Jungle, in a wasteland by the port of Calais, is actually the latest manifestation in a series of camps established since 1999, when a French reception centre became too crowded.

However, it has swelled as a result of the refugee crisis, and attempts by residents to sneak onto lorries entering the Channel Tunnel have become daily occurences. The French authorities bulldozed part of it earlier this year.

Ahead of the latest demolishment, which is expected to happen on Tuesday, Clare Moseley, founder of Care4Calais, said: “In February this year over 50 per cent of the camp was demolished and yet six months later the camp is bigger than it has ever been before. 

"This is clear evidence that demolitions do not act as a deterrent.  The refugees come because they have no choice."

Future refugees will go to other camps with even less facilities, she warned.

The camp houses thousands of residents, but because of the authorities' unwillingness to legitimise it, there is no official presence. Instead, the residents must rely on volunteer aid services and have little means to stop intruders entering. 

Although conditions in the camp can be dire, residents have created a high street with basic tent shops and restaurants catering to the needs of its displaced population. Many of those in the camp say they are there because they hope to be reunited with family in Britain, or they have given up on ever being processed by the French authorities. 

After the UK government was pressurised into passing the Dubs Amendment, which provides sanctuary to unaccompanied child refugees, some children from the camp have arrived in the UK. The first group is reportedly mostly girls from Eritrea, who will be processed at a UK immigration centre.

One of the MPs crucial to ensuring the Dubs Amendment delivered, Stella Creasy, said many more still needed help. 

Children reunited with their families under the Dublin Convention arrived in the UK last week, although their arrival was overshadowed by a debate over age checks.  

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.