Is this the end for Jeremy Hunt?

Culture Secretary under pressure after acting as a "cheerleader" for the BSkyB bid.

Jeremy Hunt is swiftly emerging as the cabinet minister with the most questions to answer following James Murdoch's testimony to the Leveson inquiry. Rupert Murdoch has submitted 163 pages of emails between News Corp lobbyist Frederic Michel and Hunt's special adviser to the inquiry, which suggest that the Culture Secretary, in the words of Robert Jay, QC, acted as a "cheerleader" for the BSkyB bid. Even before he acquired ministerial responsibility for the deal, Hunt received "strong legal advice" not to meet James Murdoch but, according to the emails, later offered to speak to him on the phone. In addition, through his special adviser, he allegedly communicated his personal support for the deal. On 15 June 2010, Hunt's special adviser reportedly told Michel, that he didn't believe there was a "media plurality issue" and that "the UK government would be supportive throughout the process".

In December, after Ofcom outlined its concerns over the bid, Michel claimed he had a "very good debrief with Hunt ... he is pretty amazed by its findings, methodology and clear bias. He very much shares our views on it."

With the full emails due to be published online after Murdoch's appearance ends at 4pm, worse is likely to come.

Hunt has never made any secret of his admiration for News Corp and Murdoch snr. In an interview with Broadcast magazine while shadow culture secretary, he argued:

Rather than worry about Rupert Murdoch owning another TV channel, what we should recognise is that he has probably done more to create variety and choice in British TV than any other single person because of his huge investment in setting up Sky TV which, at one point, was losing several million pounds a day.

We would be the poorer and wouldn't be saying that British TV is the envy of the world if it hadn't been for him being prepared to take that commercial risk. We need to encourage that kind of investment.

But given that he told MPs on 3 March that "at every stage of this process (the BSkyB deal) we have sought to be completely transparent, impartial and fair" the exchanges are deeply embarrassing and could even prove fatal. Indeed, Ladbrokes has just suspended betting on him being the next minister to leave the cabinet.

Culture Secretary Jeremy Hunt Photograph: Getty Images.

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

BBC
Show Hide image

“Why are you here?”: Juncker and MEPs mock Nigel Farage at the European Parliament

Returning to the scene of the crime.

In today's European Parliament session, Jean-Claude Juncker, president of the European Commission, tried his best to keep things cordial during a debate on Brexit. He asked MEPs to "respect British democracy and the way it voiced its view".

Unfortunately, Nigel Farage, UKIP leader and MEP, felt it necessary to voice his view a little more by applauding - the last straw even for Juncker, who turned and spat: "That's the last time you are applauding here." 

MEPs laughed and clapped, and he continued: "I am surprised you are here. You are fighting for the exit. The British people voted in f avour of the exit. Why are you here?"  

Watch the exchange here:

Farage responded with an impromptu speech, in which he pointed out that MEPs laughed when he first planned to campaign for Britain to leave the EU: "Well, you're not laughing now". Hee said the EU was in "denial" and that its project had "failed".

MPs booed again.

He continued:

"Because what the little people did, what the ordinary people did – what the people who’d been oppressed over the last few years who’d seen their living standards go down did – was they rejected the multinationals, they rejected the merchant banks, they rejected big politics and they said actually, we want our country back, we want our fishing waters back, we want our borders back. 

"We want to be an independent, self-governing, normal nation. That is what we have done and that is what must happen. In doing so we now offer a beacon of hope to democrats across the rest of the European continent. I’ll make one prediction this morning: the United Kingdom will not be the last member state to leave the European Union."

The Independent has a full transcript of the speech.

Now, it sounds like Farage had something prepared – so it's no wonder he turned up in Brussels for this important task today, while Brexiteers in Britain frantically try to put together a plan for leaving the EU.

But your mole has to wonder if perhaps, in the face of a falling British pound and a party whose major source of income is MEP salaries and expenses, Farage is less willing to give up his cushy European job than he might like us to think. 

I'm a mole, innit.