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US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

New Statesman
Elizabeth Warren, Senate candidate for Massachusetts, and Barack Obama. Photo: Getty Images

1. Plutocracy, Paralysis, Perplexity (New York Times)

Inequality is a major reason the economy is still so depressed and unemployment so high, writes Paul Krugman. And the US has responded to crisis with a mix of inaction and confusion.

2. Europe finds austerity a tight fit (Washington Post)

Harold Meyerson on the fiscal policy that had completely backfired.

3. Bin Laden and ballots (Los Angeles Times)

Obama's impulse to score points off the anniversary of Bin Laden's death is understandable, but the president should have resisted mixing military valor and politics, writes Doyle McManus.

4. Elizabeth Warren’s Birther Moment (New York Times)

Kevin Noble Maillard on the Republican approach: feign that race is irrelevant — until it becomes politically advantageous to bring it up.

5. Weak oversight will make more pipeline spills inevitable (Detroit Fress Press)

This leading article condemns Michigan state for not putting the well-being of its residents first.

6. Another sin tax on soda wrong way to fight fat (Chicago Sun Times)

Chicago and the nation can do better than a pop tax, argues this editorial.

7. Food stamps could use fresh options (Politico)

Congress has an opportunity to allow more recipients to purchase healthful, quality food, says Jason Ackerman.

8. Junior Seau’s suicide raises vital questions about football (Boston Globe) ($)

The NFL linebacker’s death this week was all the more haunting because there was speculation a year ago he showed signs of being affected by the thousands of hits to the head he suffered. A Boston Globe editorial.

9. College Grads Need Jobs, Not a Lower Loan Rate (Wall Street Journal) ($)

Young workers who enter the labor force in a recession suffer years of lower wages, writes Andrew Biggs.

10. Obama, Romney launch nasty ads early (USA Today)

According to an editorial, these attacks - produced by the two campaigns rather than by surrogate groups - will gin up even more scurrilous ads later in the race.