US press: pick of the papers

The ten must-read opinion pieces from today's US papers.

1. Plutocracy, Paralysis, Perplexity (New York Times)

Inequality is a major reason the economy is still so depressed and unemployment so high, writes Paul Krugman. And the US has responded to crisis with a mix of inaction and confusion.

2. Europe finds austerity a tight fit (Washington Post)

Harold Meyerson on the fiscal policy that had completely backfired.

3. Bin Laden and ballots (Los Angeles Times)

Obama's impulse to score points off the anniversary of Bin Laden's death is understandable, but the president should have resisted mixing military valor and politics, writes Doyle McManus.

4. Elizabeth Warren’s Birther Moment (New York Times)

Kevin Noble Maillard on the Republican approach: feign that race is irrelevant — until it becomes politically advantageous to bring it up.

5. Weak oversight will make more pipeline spills inevitable (Detroit Fress Press)

This leading article condemns Michigan state for not putting the well-being of its residents first.

6. Another sin tax on soda wrong way to fight fat (Chicago Sun Times)

Chicago and the nation can do better than a pop tax, argues this editorial.

7. Food stamps could use fresh options (Politico)

Congress has an opportunity to allow more recipients to purchase healthful, quality food, says Jason Ackerman.

8. Junior Seau’s suicide raises vital questions about football (Boston Globe) ($)

The NFL linebacker’s death this week was all the more haunting because there was speculation a year ago he showed signs of being affected by the thousands of hits to the head he suffered. A Boston Globe editorial.

9. College Grads Need Jobs, Not a Lower Loan Rate (Wall Street Journal) ($)

Young workers who enter the labor force in a recession suffer years of lower wages, writes Andrew Biggs.

10. Obama, Romney launch nasty ads early (USA Today)

According to an editorial, these attacks - produced by the two campaigns rather than by surrogate groups - will gin up even more scurrilous ads later in the race.

Elizabeth Warren, Senate candidate for Massachusetts, and Barack Obama. Photo: Getty Images
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Must I unremember the day I wept over the long, slow suicide of a 27-year-old man?

At that time we did talk about the occupation of Ireland. Now we have to pretend we didn’t and it’s all the jolly UK and thank you, England for the peace process.

The misremembering of history interrupts these tales of my own squalid past. Very often I find myself wishing my memories were wrong, or that I’d forgotten more than I have. This would certainly be the case were I to be a politician, albeit a small-time one in big-time government. In the era of renunciations and sincere apologies, I would have to say sorry most of the time.

But I can’t. I can’t get past that clear day in May 1981, when the tangy cold spring air of a New York day got right inside me. Ambling home from another long, messy night in the Village, I was near 52nd when I saw people carrying a coffin.

“It’s not him, of course. It’s a fake coffin,” said a woman who saw the shock on my face. Maybe I was already crying. I knew and didn’t know but asked anyway.

“Yes. Bobby.”

Bobby Sands had died. Crowds were gathering with banners about Smashing Long Kesh and Smashing Thatcher.

The shock of it has never left me and God knows “martyrs” come two a penny now. Yet the idea that someone can starve themselves slowly to death for an idea is shocking. The idea that someone can let them do it, either “for” a United Ireland or “for” a United Kingdom, remains profoundly disturbing to me.

I need no lectures about what vile and murderous bastards the IRA were, or the numbers of innocents they killed. Nor about the smeary sentimentality of martyrdom itself. All I can say is that I had little idea of what “we” did in Ireland as long as I lived in England. A boy at school had run off to join the IRA. My mum said, “Well, he’s always been tapped, that one.”

We were kept ignorant. For some stupid reason, I did not think that Thatcher would let the hunger strikers die.

Their demands, remember, were the right not to wear prison uniform or to do prison work, rights to free association and education within the prison, one visit, one parcel, one letter a week. They wanted to be treated as political prisoners. Thatcher said Sands had no mandate. He was actually an MP, with more votes than she ever won in Finchley.

In New York that day, when we got to Third Avenue, there was anger and then solemnity. There were mumblings about what a death like that entailed . . . Mandela then instigated a hunger strike on Robben Island. There were protests in Milan and Ghent. French towns would name streets after Sands.

At that time, though, yes, we did talk about the occupation of Ireland. Now we have to pretend we didn’t and it’s all the jolly UK and thank you, England for the peace process.

So, must I unremember that day when I sat down on the pavement and wept over the long, slow suicide of a 27-year-old man? Let me know how to uncry all those tears shed for that terrible, terrible waste.

Suzanne Moore is a writer for the Guardian and the New Statesman. She writes the weekly “Telling Tales” column in the NS.

This article first appeared in the 01 October 2015 issue of the New Statesman, The Tory tide