Free software, free speech

An pro-open source protester is arrested during a Bill Gates speech in China

It's interesting that Karoshi, a project to develop a free open source server solution for schools has been nominated in these awards. Increasingly, socially minded software developers are ganging together to provide such solutions, especially for the developing world where buying a copy of Windows Vista would bankrupt the average family or even small business.

The issue was recently highlighted when a protester calling for free computer software and open source programming crashed a speech at a Chinese university last week by Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates.

The Chinese man walked on stage and unveiled a banner with "free software, open source" written in English. He has since been identified in newspapers as Wang Yang, also known as WangKaiyuan, chief China representative for Linux, the free operating system.

It is a testament to the continuing lock-down on free speech that a simple protest advocating free software - not even human rights - meant that he was still taken away for questioning by police.

Gates's presence in China can be explained by the fact that this is a country where Microsoft is enjoying enormous growth since its market in the developed world is already saturated and, if anything, is likely to shrink over the next few years. Hence why some commentators say that Windows Vista is a system designed with the sole intent to lock you in and stop you switching to anything else.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.