The great gerrymander: Mehdi Hasan on the Tories' attempt to undermine the system

Tories continue to find new and ingenious ways to rig the electoral system in their favour.

My column in this week's magazine attacks the Tories' "brazen attempt to gerrymander the electoral system" through rewriting the rules on voter registration and switching from compulsion to volition -- which could see up to ten million mostly Labour-leaning voters just fall off the electoral register. Almost all of our major political commentators and pundits have missed this story, preferring instead to focus on the Boundary Commission's recent review of constituency boundaries.

Those of us who have objected to the review, on the grounds that it is quite possible to remove the electoral system's existing bias towards Labour without reducing the overall number of Commons seats, have been accused of being partisan, cynical and prone to conspiracy-theorising. Yet, earlier this week, at a ConservativeHome reception at the Conservative party conference in Manchester, the Transport Secretary, Philip Hammond, had this to say:

With your help -- and a little help from the boundary review -- hopefully we will be back in 2015 with a Conservative majority government.

[Hat-tip: Total Politics and Amber Elliott]

From the horse's mouth, as they say. His aides, of course, say that he made the remarks in "jest" but the point is that they're true. The boundary review will disproportionately benefit the Conservatives -- and so, too, will the proposed change to the registration of voters on the electoral list and the subsequent lack of enforcement. It is, as I say in my column, "the biggest political scandal you've never heard of".

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Fight: Arron Banks versus Mary Beard on the fall of Rome

On the one hand: one of Britain's most respected classicists. On the other: Nigel Farage's sugar daddy. 

Tom Lehrer once said that he would quit satire after Henry Kissinger – him of napalm strikes and the Nixon administration – received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Your mole is likewise minded to hand in hat, glasses and pen after the latest clash of the titans.

In the blue corner: Arron Banks, insurance millionaire and Nigel Farage’s sugar daddy.

In the red corner: Mary Beard, Professor of Classics, University of Cambridge, documentarian, author, historian of the ancient world.

It all started when Banks suggested that the fall of the Roman Empire was down to…you guessed it, immigration:

To which Beard responded:

Now, some might back down at this point. But not Banks, the only bank that never suffers from a loss of confidence.

Did Banks have another life as a classical scholar, perhaps? Twitter users were intrigued as to where he learnt so much about the ancient world. To which Banks revealed all:

I, Claudius is a novel. It was written in 1934, and concerns events approximately three centuries from the fall of Rome. But that wasn't the end of Banks' expertise:

Gladiator is a 2000 film. It is set 200 years before the fall of Rome.

Your mole rests. 

I'm a mole, innit.