Exclusive: Baroness Warsi says electoral fraud cost Tories the election

The Tory chairman tells me that Labour “absolutely” benefited.

In my interview with Sayeeda Warsi, the chairman of the Conservative Party and minister without portfolio, in this week's New Statesman, she makes a remarkable claim about the extent of electoral fraud at the last general election.

From the piece (not yet online):

"At least three seats where we lost, where we didn't gain the seat, based on electoral fraud. Now, could we have planned for that in the campaign? Absolutely not."

This is the first time a senior minister has made such a blunt and specific allegation about the impact of electoral fraud on the general election result. Can she reveal the names of those seats? "I think it would be wrong to start identifying them," she says, but adds: "It is predominantly within the Asian community. I have to look back and say we didn't do well in those communities, but was there something over and above that we could have done? Well, actually not, if there is going to be voter fraud."

I asked Warsi if she believed the Labour Party in those three seats had benefited from the alleged fraud. Her answer?

Absolutely.

The BBC has followed up on my interview and spoken to a Labour Party spokesman who says the claims are "unsubstantiated" and urges the Tory chairman to share any evidence she has with the authorities.

Watch this space.

UPDATE:

Over on the Mirror site, Kevin Maguire writes:

If she has evidence of ballot rigging, Baroness Warsi has a public duty to produce it. Democracy is precious and must be protected at all costs. If a number of MPs are sitting in the House of Commons without electoral legitimacy, we need to rerun those contests. So Baroness Warsi must go public. And if she doesn't, I'll draw the conclusion that the petulant peer's just shouting her mouth off again.

ConservativeHome's Tim Montgomerie has also blogged on the story here.

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Election 2017: Which Labour MPs are standing down?

13 Labour MPs have announced they will not fight the June 8 general election.

Theresa May's decision to call a snap election - and the grim outlook for Labour - means a number of the party's MPs will not fight the June 8 poll. Here's a full list. 

Dave Anderson (Shadow Scotland and Northern Ireland Secretary) - Blaydon (14,227 majority)

Tom Blenkinsop - Middlesbrough South and East Cleveland (2,268 majority)

Andy Burnham - Leigh (14,096 majority)

Jim Dowd - Lewisham West and Penge (12,714 majoirty)

Michael Dugher - Barnsley East (12,034 majority)

Pat Glass - North West Durham (10,056 majority)

Alan Johnson - Hull West and Hessle (9,333 majority)

Fiona MacTaggart - Slough (7,336 majority)

Rob Marris - Wolverhampton South West (801 majority)

Steve Rotheram - Liverpol Walton (27,777 majority)

Andrew Smith - Oxford East (15,280 majority)

Gisela Stuart - Birmingham Edgbaston (2,706 majority)

Iain Wright - Hartlepool (3,024 majority)

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