So what will David Miliband do if he is defeated by Brother Ed?

Will he stay or will he go?

In my interview with David Miliband in July in the magazine, I pushed the shadow foreign secretary on whether he'd quit the shadow cabinet if he lost to his younger brother, Ed, on 25 September. Mili-D replied, after some ducking and dodging of the original question:

I'm not walking away from the people of South Shields. I'm not walking away from the Labour Party . . . I'm very happy to serve under anyone.

Since that interview, more and more "friends" and "allies" of the elder Miliband have suggested he simply would not be able to serve under Ed and that we would indeed see the former foreign secretary "walking away" from front-bench politics. As this magazine has argued, that would be a "tragedy" for the Labour Party.

So, on yesterday's Politics Show, on BBC1, I thought I'd ask David to clarify his position and ask whether he'd give an explicit, on-air guarantee that he'd stay in the shadow cabinet under an Ed Miliband leadership. He responded:

Of course. And I am absolutely clear about my intentions, my assumptions, and I answered that very, very clearly.

The presenter, Jon Sopel, then asked him whether it would be "difficult" to serve under Ed, to which David replied, after a pause:

I don't think . . . I don't know, is the truth.

Hmm. I tried winding him up again, later on, pointing out that "I could never serve under my younger brother" (note: I don't have a younger brother!), and the shadow foreign secretary responded with this firm and rather amusing statement:

That says a lot about why you're in journalism and I'm in politics. I'm a man of infinite patience and you're a man of infinite impatience.

Assuming Ed Miliband wins -- and despite the new Sunday Times/YouGov poll suggesting he will, it's still a big "if" -- let's see how "infinite" David's patience is . . .

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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New Digital Editor: Serena Kutchinsky

The New Statesman appoints Serena Kutchinsky as Digital Editor.

Serena Kutchinsky is to join the New Statesman as digital editor in September. She will lead the expansion of the New Statesman across a variety of digital platforms.

Serena has over a decade of experience working in digital media and is currently the digital editor of Newsweek Europe. Since she joined the title, traffic to the website has increased by almost 250 per cent. Previously, Serena was the digital editor of Prospect magazine and also the assistant digital editor of the Sunday Times - part of the team which launched the Sunday Times website and tablet editions.

Jason Cowley, New Statesman editor, said: “Serena joins us at a great time for the New Statesman, and, building on the excellent work of recent years, she has just the skills and experience we need to help lead the next stage of our expansion as a print-digital hybrid.”

Serena Kutchinsky said: “I am delighted to be joining the New Statesman team and to have the opportunity to drive forward its digital strategy. The website is already established as the home of free-thinking journalism online in the UK and I look forward to leading our expansion and growing the global readership of this historic title.

In June, the New Statesman website recorded record traffic figures when more than four million unique users read more than 27 million pages. The circulation of the weekly magazine is growing steadily and now stands at 33,400, the highest it has been since the early 1980s.