Britain’s most influential Muslim?

The Indie’s fascinating interview with Tim Winter.

I've long considered Tim Winter -- aka Sheikh Abdul-Hakim Murad -- to be one of Britain's most interesting Muslims, but I hadn't realised that he had been named as the country's most influential Muslim (ahead of Baroness Warsi, Tory party chair and member of the cabinet, and the UK's first Muslim life peer, Lord (Nazir) Ahmed).

Winter -- the blonde-haired, blue-eyed, goateed Cambridge academic and elder brother of the Telegraph's Henry Winter -- is interviewed in today's Independent, and the whole piece is worth a read.

Here he is, commenting on the radicalisation of some young Muslim men:

The principal reason, which Whitehall cannot admit, is that people are incensed by foreign policy. Iraq is a smoking ruin in the Iranian orbit. Those who are from a Muslim background are disgusted by the hypocrisy. It was never about WMDs. It was about oil, about Israel and evangelical Christianity in the White House. That makes people incandescent with anger. What is required first of all is an act of public contrition. Tony Blair must go down on his knees and admit he has been responsible for almost unimaginable human suffering and despair.

And here he is on his relationship with his brother, the high-profile sports journo:

The son of an architect and an artist, he attended the elite Westminster School in the 1970s before graduating from Cambridge with a double First in Arabic in 1983. His younger brother is the football correspondent Henry Winter. Tim says: "I was always the clever, successful one. Henry just wanted to play football with his mates. I used to tell him, 'I'm going to make loads of money, and you'll still be playing football with your mates.' Now he's living in a house with ten bedrooms and married to a Bond girl." (Brother Henry insists on the telephone later: "She was only in the opening credits. And it's not as many as ten.")

As I said, the whole interview is worth a read -- if only to discover why Winter attributes his conversion to Islam to "a teenage French Jewish nudist".

Enjoy!

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Forget gaining £350m a week, Brexit would cost the UK £300m a week

Figures from the government's own Office for Budget Responsibility reveal the negative economic impact Brexit would have. 

Even now, there are some who persist in claiming that Boris Johnson's use of the £350m a week figure was accurate. The UK's gross, as opposed to net EU contribution, is precisely this large, they say. Yet this ignores that Britain's annual rebate (which reduced its overall 2016 contribution to £252m a week) is not "returned" by Brussels but, rather, never leaves Britain to begin with. 

Then there is the £4.1bn that the government received from the EU in public funding, and the £1.5bn allocated directly to British organisations. Fine, the Leavers say, the latter could be better managed by the UK after Brexit (with more for the NHS and less for agriculture).

But this entire discussion ignores that EU withdrawal is set to leave the UK with less, rather than more, to spend. As Carl Emmerson, the deputy director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, notes in a letter in today's Times: "The bigger picture is that the forecast health of the public finances was downgraded by £15bn per year - or almost £300m per week - as a direct result of the Brexit vote. Not only will we not regain control of £350m weekly as a result of Brexit, we are likely to make a net fiscal loss from it. Those are the numbers and forecasts which the government has adopted. It is perhaps surprising that members of the government are suggesting rather different figures."

The Office for Budget Responsibility forecasts, to which Emmerson refers, are shown below (the £15bn figure appearing in the 2020/21 column).

Some on the right contend that a blitz of tax cuts and deregulation following Brexit would unleash  higher growth. But aside from the deleterious economic and social consequences that could result, there is, as I noted yesterday, no majority in parliament or in the country for this course. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.