A warning about the Tories ahead of tomorrow’s all-important vote

Kinnock then, Brown now.

Seeing how Gordon Brown has been delivering some Kinnock-esque barnstorming speeches in recent days, and seeing how Jonathan Freedland uses his Guardian column today to remind us of the classic "I warn you" speech by Neil Kinnock on the eve of the 1983 general election, I thought I'd reproduce the best bit from that speech, as I have done before:

If Margaret Thatcher is re-elected as prime minister on Thursday, I warn you . . . I warn you that you must not expect work -- when many cannot spend, more will not be able to earn. When they don't earn, they don't spend. When they don't spend, work dies. I warn you not to go into the streets alone after dark or into the streets in large crowds of protest in the light. I warn you that you will be quiet -- when the curfew of fear and the gibbet of unemployment make you obedient. I warn you that you will have defence of a sort -- with a risk and at a price that passes all understanding. I warn you that you will be home-bound -- when fares and transport bills kill leisure and lock you up. I warn you that you will borrow less -- when credit, loans, mortgages and easy payments are refused to people on your melting income.

If Margaret Thatcher wins on Thursday, I warn you not to be ordinary. I warn you not to be young. I warn you not to fall ill. I warn you not to get old.

Given the forthcoming "age of austerity" that the Tories have promised us, and given the danger of a double-dip recession under George Osborne, I think Kinnock's words are as relevant in 2010 as they were in 1983 -- if not more so.

God help us all if David Cameron strolls into No 10 on Friday -- though, like James, I still think it might not happen.

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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PMQs review: Theresa May shows again that Brexit means hard Brexit

The Prime Minister's promise of "an end to free movement" is incompatible with single market membership. 

Theresa May, it is commonly said, has told us nothing about Brexit. At today's PMQs, Jeremy Corbyn ran with this line, demanding that May offer "some clarity". In response, as she has before, May stated what has become her defining aim: "an end to free movement". This vow makes a "hard Brexit" (or "chaotic Brexit" as Corbyn called it) all but inevitable. The EU regards the "four freedoms" (goods, capital, services and people) as indivisible and will not grant the UK an exemption. The risk of empowering eurosceptics elsewhere is too great. Only at the cost of leaving the single market will the UK regain control of immigration.

May sought to open up a dividing line by declaring that "the Labour Party wants to continue with free movement" (it has refused to rule out its continuation). "I want to deliver on the will of the British people, he is trying to frustrate the British people," she said. The problem is determining what the people's will is. Though polls show voters want control of free movement, they also show they want to maintain single market membership. It is not only Boris Johnson who is pro-having cake and pro-eating it. 

Corbyn later revealed that he had been "consulting the great philosophers" as to the meaning of Brexit (a possible explanation for the non-mention of Heathrow, Zac Goldsmith's resignation and May's Goldman Sachs speech). "All I can come up with is Baldrick, who says our cunning plan is to have no plan," he quipped. Without missing a beat, May replied: "I'm interested that [he] chose Baldrick, of course the actor playing Baldrick was a member of the Labour Party, as I recall." (Tony Robinson, a Corbyn critic ("crap leader"), later tweeted that he still is one). "We're going to deliver the best possible deal in goods and services and we're going to deliver an end to free movement," May continued. The problem for her is that the latter aim means that the "best possible deal" may be a long way from the best. 

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.