Cameron, Next and “padded bras”

Will the Conservative leader condemn the Tory party donor Simon Wolfson?

David Cameron yesterday was quick to condemn the high-street chain Primark as "disgraceful" for selling swimsuits with padded bras for seven- and eight-year-olds -- or "paedo bikinis", in the typically inimitable words of the Sun, which broke the story.

With the Tory manifesto highlighting the "sexualisation" and "commercialisation" of young children as a campaign issue, it's not surprising that the Tory leader was so "delighted" to see Primark apologise, and immediately withdraw the offensive clothing range, only days after his party's manifesto launch.

However, today's Sun moves the story on, reporting that other leading high-street clothing stores, including Next, Tammy and Peacocks, have been selling similar items. Next, says the Sun, sells "padded bras in Size 28AA in their girls' sections online".

So, will Cameron also be condemning Next as "disgraceful"? Will he be calling for a boycott of Next by parents of young girls? Or reminding Next of its responsibilities, as he did with Primark?

I doubt it. Next's chief executive is Simon Wolfson, one of David Cameron's most vociferous supporters in the business world, having donated to Cameron's campaign in the 2005 leadership election and co-chaired the party's Economic Competitiveness policy review.

He also happened to co-ordinate the all-important letter from business leaders backing the Tories' National Insurance policy last week. Oh, and his dad, Lord Wolfson, is a former Thatcher lackey.

So, expect radio silence from Cameron on Wolfson. Primark, BAD BAD BAD. Next, perhaps not so bad.

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Police shoot man in parliament

A man carrying what appeared to be a knife was shot by armed police after entering the parliamentary estate. 

From the window of the parliamentary Press Gallery, I have just seen police shoot a man who charged at officers while carrying what appeared to be a knife. A large crowd was seen fleeing from the man before he entered the parliamentary estate.

After several officers evaded him he was swiftly shot by armed police.

Ministers have been evacuated and journalists ordered to remain at their desks. 

More follows. Read Julia Rampen's news story here.

Armed police at the cordon outside Parliament on Wednesday afternoon. Photo: Getty

George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.