Hung parliament? Fine by us, say rating agencies

Tories wrong to fearmonger about the election result.

Earlier this week, Ken Clarke predicted panic in the financial markets -- causing a "wobble" in the pound -- if the general election failed to deliver a decisive result. "Scaremongering of the worst kind", was the rather appropriate response from the Lib Dems' Vince Cable.

Today, David Cameron has continued with his own nonsensical fearmongering about the prospects of a hung parliament and "no overall control" in Westminster in a speech to business leaders.

But here's Arnaud Mares, lead UK analyst for the credit rating agency Moody's:

A hung parliament does not in itself have direct implications for Moody's UK rating.

Mares said a hung parliament could help rather than hinder Britain's efforts to reduce its deficit if it delivers public support for spending cuts:

If you had a fiscal plan agreed by a coalition, that could actually be quite positive, because it would imply broad popular support.

Moody's is not alone here. The rival rating agency Fitch says its own outlook for the UK economy remains "stable". And Capital Economics, the consultancy firm, says that the markets have "priced in" a hung parliament now, and are calmer about the idea.

So will Cameron, Clarke and co let this go now? Or will we hear more and more nonsense from desperate Tories about the supposedly devastating financial impact of a hung parliament as 6 May approaches? I suspect we will . . .

 

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.