Hung parliament? Fine by us, say rating agencies

Tories wrong to fearmonger about the election result.

Earlier this week, Ken Clarke predicted panic in the financial markets -- causing a "wobble" in the pound -- if the general election failed to deliver a decisive result. "Scaremongering of the worst kind", was the rather appropriate response from the Lib Dems' Vince Cable.

Today, David Cameron has continued with his own nonsensical fearmongering about the prospects of a hung parliament and "no overall control" in Westminster in a speech to business leaders.

But here's Arnaud Mares, lead UK analyst for the credit rating agency Moody's:

A hung parliament does not in itself have direct implications for Moody's UK rating.

Mares said a hung parliament could help rather than hinder Britain's efforts to reduce its deficit if it delivers public support for spending cuts:

If you had a fiscal plan agreed by a coalition, that could actually be quite positive, because it would imply broad popular support.

Moody's is not alone here. The rival rating agency Fitch says its own outlook for the UK economy remains "stable". And Capital Economics, the consultancy firm, says that the markets have "priced in" a hung parliament now, and are calmer about the idea.

So will Cameron, Clarke and co let this go now? Or will we hear more and more nonsense from desperate Tories about the supposedly devastating financial impact of a hung parliament as 6 May approaches? I suspect we will . . .

 

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Tony Blair won't endorse the Labour leader - Jeremy Corbyn's fans are celebrating

The thrice-elected Prime Minister is no fan of the new Labour leader. 

Labour heavyweights usually support each other - at least in public. But the former Prime Minister Tony Blair couldn't bring himself to do so when asked on Sky News.

He dodged the question of whether the current Labour leader was the best person to lead the country, instead urging voters not to give Theresa May a "blank cheque". 

If this seems shocking, it's worth remembering that Corbyn refused to say whether he would pick "Trotskyism or Blairism" during the Labour leadership campaign. Corbyn was after all behind the Stop the War Coalition, which opposed Blair's decision to join the invasion of Iraq. 

For some Corbyn supporters, it seems that there couldn't be a greater boon than the thrice-elected PM witholding his endorsement in a critical general election. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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