More on the Tories and the myth of government “waste”

John Maynard Keynes pooh-poohs Sir Stuart Rose et al.

My NS colleague and good friend, the economist and former MPC member David "Danny" Blanchflower, has asked me to highlight this letter, published in yesterday's Financial Times, which he co-authored with Robert Skidelsky.

Sir, How many of those business leaders who complain that raising National Insurance contributions is a "tax on jobs" realise that the "efficiency savings" that they demand would destroy jobs just as certainly?

Raising National Insurance contributions attacks jobs by reducing profits per unit of output: an "efficiency saving" by government cuts costs by putting someone out of work. Both measures aim to reduce the government deficit at the expense of jobs. That is why the government has wisely postponed raising NI contributions and cutting "waste" until economic recovery is under way.

The general point is that expenditure that would be "wasteful" in normal times can be useful in depressed times. When an economy is growing strongly we need to cut out waste; when it is depressed, what is called "wasteful" spending can keep up aggregate demand, employment and sales. Keynes might have been thinking of our eminent business leaders when he wrote that "common sense" is apt to prefer wholly wasteful forms of public spending such as unemployment benefits to partly wasteful forms such as over-manning in government agencies.

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Quiz: Can you identify fake news?

The furore around "fake" news shows no sign of abating. Can you spot what's real and what's not?

Hillary Clinton has spoken out today to warn about the fake news epidemic sweeping the world. Clinton went as far as to say that "lives are at risk" from fake news, the day after Pope Francis compared reading fake news to eating poop. (Side note: with real news like that, who needs the fake stuff?)

The sweeping distrust in fake news has caused some confusion, however, as many are unsure about how to actually tell the reals and the fakes apart. Short from seeing whether the logo will scratch off and asking the man from the market where he got it from, how can you really identify fake news? Take our test to see whether you have all the answers.

 

 

In all seriousness, many claim that identifying fake news is a simple matter of checking the source and disbelieving anything "too good to be true". Unfortunately, however, fake news outlets post real stories too, and real news outlets often slip up and publish the fakes. Use fact-checking websites like Snopes to really get to the bottom of a story, and always do a quick Google before you share anything. 

Amelia Tait is a technology and digital culture writer at the New Statesman.