Thank you, Auntie, says Nick Griffin

The BBC is indeed helping the BNP

If you haven't already read it, check out Fiona Hamilton and Tom Baldwin's fascinating interview with Nick Griffin in the Times.

He congratulates himself for having backed the BBC -- which, he says, is institutionally biased against the party -- "into a corner" over his right to appearance, before offering sarcastic gratitude to "the political class and their allies for being so stupid" as to allow it.

I hope that any BBC boss who read the piece felt a shiver go down their spine. Do they understand what they have done? I guess we'll find out tonight.

Note: I will be live-blogging Question Time here on the NS Dissident Voice blog from 10.35pm onwards.

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.