Rewarding hard work?

Executive pay is unfair, undeserved and out of control

The Guardian's front-page "special report" focuses on how pay for executives at Britain's top companies has leapt 10 per cent over the past year, despite their companies losing almost a third of their value in the wake of the worst financial crisis in living memory.

One corporate example, in particular, stood out to me:

The best-paid boardroom last year was that of Tullow Oil, a London-based oil exploration business, where 11 directors picked up a total of £59m. Most of their gains came from share options, as they cashed in on a share price that had soared along with the oil price. The directors made much more from their cheap share handouts than the rest of the 470-strong workforce were paid in the year.

So much for the argument that businessmen who rake in obscenly large salaries on the back of huge company profits deserve the money as a reward for their hard work. Why should the bosses at Tullow Oil -- including the chief executive and founder, Aidan Heavey, who took home an eye-watering £28.8m last year -- benefit so disproportionately from something as arbitary and uncontrollable as a record oil price? And why are we not taxing them more, in the middle of a recession, a time when politicians on all sides can't stop banging on about the need for spending cuts?

Politics of envy, I hear you ask? In my view, there's not enough envy around. Or outrage.

Mehdi Hasan is a contributing writer for the New Statesman and the co-author of Ed: The Milibands and the Making of a Labour Leader. He was the New Statesman's senior editor (politics) from 2009-12.

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.