Nightjack: former Times lawyer interviewed under caution

Officers from Operation Tuleta interview Alastair Brett

The New Statesman has learned that Alastair Brett, the former legal manager at the Times, has been interviewed under caution by officers from Operation Tuleta, the Scotland Yard investigation into computer hacking.

The interview took place on 11 September by appointment at a London police station.  Brett was not arrested.  

Brett's interview under caution followed the arrest on 29 August of Patrick Foster, the Times reporter who allegedly hacked into the email account of the NightJack blogger Richard Horton.  

Brett was the in-house lawyer who advised the Times on resisting the privacy injunction application of Horton, and he was closely questioned by Lord Justice Leveson as to his role in the Times outing of Horton.  Brett is also facing an investigation by the Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Horton is currently suing the Times for breach of confidence, misuse of private information, and deceit.

 

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of New Statesman

 

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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The section on climate change has already disappeared from the White House website

As soon as Trump was president, the page on climate change started showing an error message.

Melting sea ice, sad photographs of polar bears, scientists' warnings on the Guardian homepage. . . these days, it's hard to avoid the question of climate change. This mole's anxiety levels are rising faster than the sea (and that, unfortunately, is saying something).

But there is one place you can go for a bit of respite: the White House website.

Now that Donald Trump is president of the United States, we can all scroll through the online home of the highest office in the land without any niggling worries about that troublesome old man-made existential threat. That's because the minute that Trump finished his inauguration speech, the White House website's page about climate change went offline.

Here's what the page looked like on January 1st:

And here's what it looks like now that Donald Trump is president:

The perfect summary of Trump's attitude to global warming.

Now, the only references to climate on the website is Trump's promise to repeal "burdensome regulations on our energy industry", such as, er. . . the Climate Action Plan.

This mole tries to avoid dramatics, but really: are we all doomed?

I'm a mole, innit.