Nightjack: former Times lawyer interviewed under caution

Officers from Operation Tuleta interview Alastair Brett

The New Statesman has learned that Alastair Brett, the former legal manager at the Times, has been interviewed under caution by officers from Operation Tuleta, the Scotland Yard investigation into computer hacking.

The interview took place on 11 September by appointment at a London police station.  Brett was not arrested.  

Brett's interview under caution followed the arrest on 29 August of Patrick Foster, the Times reporter who allegedly hacked into the email account of the NightJack blogger Richard Horton.  

Brett was the in-house lawyer who advised the Times on resisting the privacy injunction application of Horton, and he was closely questioned by Lord Justice Leveson as to his role in the Times outing of Horton.  Brett is also facing an investigation by the Solicitors Regulation Authority.

Horton is currently suing the Times for breach of confidence, misuse of private information, and deceit.


David Allen Green is legal correspondent of New Statesman


David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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PMQs review: Jeremy Corbyn hammers David Cameron on green energy – but skips Syria

In a low-key exchange ahead of the Autumn Statement, the Labour leader covered two areas where the government is vulnerable: renewable energy and women's refuges. However, he failed to mention Syria and the Russian plane shot down by Turkey.

When PMQs precedes an Autumn Statement or Budget it is usually a low-key affair, and this one was no different. But perhaps for different reasons than the usual – the opposition pulling its punches to give room for hammering the government on the economy, and the Prime Minister saving big announcements and boasts for his Chancellor.

No, Jeremy Corbyn's decision to hold off on the main issue of the day – air strikes in Syria and the Russian military jet shot down by Turkey – was tactical. He chose to question the government on two areas where it is vulnerable: green energy and women's refuges closing due to cuts. Both topics on which the Tories should be ashamed of their record.

This also allowed him to avoid the subject that is tearing the Middle East – and the Labour party – apart: how to tackle Isis in Syria. Corbyn is seen as soft on defence and has been seen as too sympathetic to Russia, so silence on both the subject of air strikes and the Russian plane was his best option.

The only problem with this approach is that the government's most pressing current concern was left to the SNP leader Angus Robertson, who asked the Prime Minister about the dangers of action from the air alone in Syria. A situation that frames Labour as on the fringe of debates about foreign and defence policy. Luckily for Corbyn, this won't really matter as no one pays attention to PMQs pre-Autumn Statement.

Anoosh Chakelian is deputy web editor at the New Statesman.