Why do we tolerate Press TV?

An interesting question on the Iranian state-funded station based in London

I recently wrote about my appearance on Press TV, the London-based Iranian channel. The discussion on radicalism was perfectly cordial, but I did wonder what exactly the station was for.

David T at Harry's Place has raised further questions about the wisdom of hosting a holocaust-denying propaganda outlet in the UK.

With his usual panache, David points out that the Press TV website published a piece by holocaust denier Nicolas Kollerstrom that concludes "that the alleged massacre of Jewish people by gassing during World War II was scientifically impossible".

Press TV then published the following statement: "The distinguished academic was dismissed on April 22, 2008 without any explanation and a Holocaust conference held on 16-18 May in Berlin refused his article and warned that he would be arrested if he attended the conference and presented his essay.
The West punishes people for their scientific research on Holocaust but the same western countries allow insults to prophets and religious beliefs…"

In fact, this western country allows a level of freedom of speech to Press TV which would have it closed down in most countries.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.