So this definitely isn't a cynical attempt to hijack breast cancer awareness month

Pornhub has a pink ribbon.

Visitors to porn hub Pornhub this month are greeted with a pink-ribboned logo, and this header:

Which, if clicked on, takes them to this page:

The text reads:

Help Pornhub support breast cancer research simply by watching videos!

Hey, we all love boobs! So this October, Pornhub will donate 1 cent for every 30 videos viewed from our big-tit and small-tit categories. The more videos viewed, the bigger our donation will be to a breast cancer research charity.

How can you help?

Click below to watch the best big-tit and small-tit videos on Pornhub. While you're enjoying the boobs, you'll also be helping to Save the Boobs!

Much has been written about the "pink-washing" industry - companies putting a pink ribbon on products which donate fractions of cents to breast cancer research, and then claiming the ethical kudos - and equally, many have complained about the focus on breasts, rather than the women behind them. A good place to start would be Xeni Jardin's twitter feed, or s.e. smith's piece at this ain't livin. But if this example doesn't sum all those problems up in a nutshell, I don't know what does.

No.

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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Lord Sainsbury pulls funding from Progress and other political causes

The longstanding Labour donor will no longer fund party political causes. 

Centrist Labour MPs face a funding gap for their ideas after the longstanding Labour donor Lord Sainsbury announced he will stop financing party political causes.

Sainsbury, who served as a New Labour minister and also donated to the Liberal Democrats, is instead concentrating on charitable causes. 

Lord Sainsbury funded the centrist organisation Progress, dubbed the “original Blairite pressure group”, which was founded in mid Nineties and provided the intellectual underpinnings of New Labour.

The former supermarket boss is understood to still fund Policy Network, an international thinktank headed by New Labour veteran Peter Mandelson.

He has also funded the Remain campaign group Britain Stronger in Europe. The latter reinvented itself as Open Britain after the Leave vote, and has campaigned for a softer Brexit. Its supporters include former Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and Labour's Chuka Umunna, and it now relies on grassroots funding.

Sainsbury said he wished to “hand the baton on to a new generation of donors” who supported progressive politics. 

Progress director Richard Angell said: “Progress is extremely grateful to Lord Sainsbury for the funding he has provided for over two decades. We always knew it would not last forever.”

The organisation has raised a third of its funding target from other donors, but is now appealing for financial support from Labour supporters. Its aims include “stopping a hard-left take over” of the Labour party and “renewing the ideas of the centre-left”. 

Julia Rampen is the digital news editor of the New Statesman (previously editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog). She has also been deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines. 

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