Fact or Fiction: TwentyTwelve or 2012?

The Olympics are just one cock-up after the next. But are we in sitcom territory yet?

The path to the summer Olympics has been one of cock-up after cock-up. So much so that, just as Armando Iannucci must be finding it tricky to write the new series of The Thick of It, so the makers of TwentyTwelve, the BBC sitcom based around the many failings of the "Olympic Deliverence Agency", must be feeling rather prescient.

But are they? See if you can tell which of these are from 2012, and which are from TwentyTwelve:

1. A safe-sex ad campaign had to be dropped due to complaints from Catholic countries. 

2. The Olympic torch was blown out in Great Torrington.

3. George Galloway announced he was planning to perform a citizens arrest on a Middle-Eastern dictator.

4. The interfaith worship centre was moved to a different building in the park after someone realised it didn't face Mecca.

5. A busload full of dignitaries gets lost on the way to the olympic stadium.

6. A naked man with "Free Tibet" on his bottom interrupted the torch relay.

7. Protestors dumped a pile of horse manure outside the organisers' offices in protest at the closure of Greenwich park for equestrianism.

8. An executive was shot in the foot testing a faulty starter pistol.

9. The Olympic Torch was blown out in Greece.

10. The official £5 Olympic Coin is sold for £40.

11. Until special laws were passed, the pistols used in the shooting events were illegal in Britain.

12. At the same time as Seb Coe launched "Diversity Day", Boris Johnson launched "Inclusivity Day".

Highlight for answers:

1. TwentyTwelve 2. 2012 3. 2012 4. TwentyTwelve 5. Both 6. 2012 7. TwentyTwelve 8. TwentyTwelve 9. 2012 10. 2012 11. 2012 12. Twenty Twelve

A mess-up of Olympic proportions

Alex Hern is a technology reporter for the Guardian. He was formerly staff writer at the New Statesman. You should follow Alex on Twitter.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.