Memo: water cannons part of the plan, Laurie Penny learns

Security firm's email also identifies location of possible kettle.

Two hours ago, I was passed this email via a trusted source. It suggests that police plan to kettle demonstrators along the route of today's education march, and that plans are in place to use potentially lethal water cannon "if need be". The memo appears to come from Business Monitor International (BMI, a security risk company. The police have denied the suggestion.)

 

Student protest email

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Right now, I'm standing at Malet Street with several thousand students, unionists and allies waiting for the march to leave Bloomsbury and head to the City of London.

The stated aims of the march, which was called by the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts, are to "support the 30 November Strikers" and to "stop the HE White Paper" which is set to open up British universities to further privatisation after last year's vote to triple tuition fees.

Demonstrators are calling for a tax on the rich to fund free higher education in the UK, and the selection of the City of London as a target makes a clear statement that protesters see corporate greed and public sector cuts as inextricably connected.

One year ago tomorrow, students took over the Conservative Party's headquarters at Millbank. After a year of arrests, kettling and brutal crackdowns, the shift to targeting banks rather than Parliament is perhaps indicative of a growing awareness of where and by whom power is truly wielded in Britain today.

A spokesman for BMI declined to comment on the specifics of the memo, but added that the company was often given information "which we pass on internally".

 

 

Laurie Penny is a contributing editor to the New Statesman. She is the author of five books, most recently Unspeakable Things.

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This is no time for a coup against a successful Labour leader

Don't blame Jeremy Corbyn for the Labour Party's crisis.

"The people who are sovereign in our party are the members," said John McDonnell this morning. As the coup against Jeremy Corbyn gains pace, the Shadow Chancellor has been talking a lot of sense. "It is time for people to come together to work in the interest of the country," he told Peston on Sunday, while emphasising that people will quickly lose trust in politics altogether if this internal squabbling continues. 

The Tory party is in complete disarray. Just days ago, the first Tory leader in 23 years to win a majority for his party was forced to resign from Government after just over a year in charge. We have some form of caretaker Government. Those who led the Brexit campaign now have no idea what to do. 

It is disappointing that a handful of Labour parliamentarians have decided to join in with the disintegration of British politics.

The Labour Party had the opportunity to keep its head while all about it lost theirs. It could have positioned itself as a credible alternative to a broken Government and a Tory party in chaos. Instead we have been left with a pathetic attempt to overturn the democratic will of the membership. 

But this has been coming for some time. In my opinion it has very little to do with the ramifications of the referendum result. Jeremy Corbyn was asked to do two things throughout the campaign: first, get Labour voters to side with Remain, and second, get young people to do the same.

Nearly seven in ten Labour supporters backed Remain. Young voters supported Remain by a 4:1 margin. This is about much more than an allegedly half-hearted referendum performance.

The Parliamentary Labour Party has failed to come to terms with Jeremy Corbyn’s emphatic victory. In September of last year he was elected with 59.5 per cent of the vote, some 170,000 ahead of his closest rival. It is a fact worth repeating. If another Labour leadership election were to be called I would expect Jeremy Corbyn to win by a similar margin.

In the recent local elections Jeremy managed to increase Labour’s share of the national vote on the 2015 general election. They said he would lose every by-election. He has won them emphatically. Time and time again Jeremy has exceeded expectation while also having to deal with an embittered wing within his own party.

This is no time for a leadership coup. I am dumbfounded by the attempt to remove Jeremy. The only thing that will come out of this attempted coup is another leadership election that Jeremy will win. Those opposed to him will then find themselves back at square one. Such moves only hurt Labour’s electoral chances. Labour could be offering an ambitious plan to the country concerning our current relationship with Europe, if opponents of Jeremy Corbyn hadn't decided to drop a nuke on the party.

This is a crisis Jeremy should take no responsibility for. The "bitterites" will try and they will fail. Corbyn may face a crisis of confidence. But it's the handful of rebel Labour MPs that have forced the party into a crisis of existence.

Liam Young is a commentator for the IndependentNew Statesman, Mirror and others.