The desperation of Julian Assange

Complainants of rape and sexual assault have rights too.

Julian Assange today sought refuge in the London Embassy of Ecuador. It is reported he is seeking political asylum.

Assange is, of course, entitled to assert whatever legal rights he has in resisting extradition to Sweden to answer serious allegations of rape and sexual assault.

But every delay, every evasion, of Assange in answering these allegations is also a further delay in dealing with the allegations.

It appears to me that Assange’s ploy is just another desperate stunt to frustrate and circumvent due process for investigating these allegations.

The allegations of rape and sexual assault against Assange are serious, and they require answering.

There is something which should not be forgotten in all this.

Complainants of rape and sexual assault have rights too.

WikiLeaks chief Julian Assange. Photograph: Getty Images

David Allen Green is legal correspondent of the New Statesman and author of the Jack of Kent blog.

His legal journalism has included popularising the Simon Singh libel case and discrediting the Julian Assange myths about his extradition case.  His uncovering of the Nightjack email hack by the Times was described as "masterly analysis" by Lord Justice Leveson.

David is also a solicitor and was successful in the "Twitterjoketrial" appeal at the High Court.

(Nothing on this blog constitutes legal advice.)

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Andy Burnham's full speech on attack: "Manchester is waking up to the most difficult of dawns"

"We are grieving today, but we are strong."

Following Monday night's terror attack on an Ariana Grande concert at the Manchester Arena, newly elected mayor of the city Andy Burnham, gave a speech outside Manchester Town Hall on Tuesday morning, the full text of which is below: 

After our darkest of nights, Manchester is today waking up to the most difficult of dawns. 

It’s hard to believe what has happened here in the last few hours and to put into words the shock, anger and hurt that we feel today.

These were children, young people and their families that those responsible chose to terrorise and kill.

This was an evil act. Our first thoughts are with the families of those killed and injured. And we will do whatever we can to support them.

We are grieving today, but we are strong. Today it will be business as usual as far as possible in our great city.

I want to thank the hundreds of police, fire and ambulance staff who worked throughout the night in the most difficult circumstances imaginable.

We have had messages of support from cities around the country and across the world, and we want to thank them for that.

But lastly I wanted to thank the people of Manchester. Even in the minute after the attack, they opened their doors to strangers and drove them away from danger.

They gave the best possible immediate response to those who seek to divide us and it will be that spirit of Manchester that will prevail and hold us together.

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