VIDEO: Boris, Dave and Ed boogie to the Spice Girls

The gif that keeps on giving.

Surely the highlight of the Olympic closing ceremony was the quick cutaway to the VIP area during the Spice Girls performance. It captured David Cameron, Boris Johnson, Ed Miliband and their wives dancing with... let's go with "abandon".

This being 2012, year of the Great Gif Resurgence, this was doing the rounds on Twitter within minutes.

What's interesting here is that David Cameron looks mildly embarrassing as he half-heartedly claps along, while Boris - executing a full-on swivel-hipped, thumbs-up boogie - mysteriously manages to be less excruciating as a result. 

Bonus points to whoever can identify the man on the right wiping away a tear, as well he might.

Victoria Beckham at the Olympic closing ceremony. Photo: Getty

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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What did Jeremy Corbyn really say about Bin Laden?

He's been critiqued for calling Bin Laden's death a "tragedy". But what did Jeremy Corbyn really say?

Jeremy Corbyn is under fire for describing Bin Laden’s death as a “tragedy” in the Sun, but what did the Labour leadership frontrunner really say?

In remarks made to Press TV, the state-backed Iranian broadcaster, the Islington North MP said:

“This was an assassination attempt, and is yet another tragedy, upon a tragedy, upon a tragedy. The World Trade Center was a tragedy, the attack on Afghanistan was a tragedy, the war in Iraq was a tragedy. Tens of thousands of people have died.”

He also added that it was his preference that Osama Bin Laden be put on trial, a view shared by, among other people, Barack Obama and Boris Johnson.

Although Andy Burnham, one of Corbyn’s rivals for the leadership, will later today claim that “there is everything to play for” in the contest, with “tens of thousands still to vote”, the row is unlikely to harm Corbyn’s chances of becoming Labour leader. 

Stephen Bush is editor of the Staggers, the New Statesman’s political blog.