Praise be! The PlayStation Network is back online again

After a three-week shutdown, I can once again play <em>Little Big Planet</em> the way nature intende

It's over. After three weeks without access to user-generated Little Big Planet levels, life is back to normal.

Just before Easter, Sony detected a "external intrusion" on PlayStation's online network, PSN, which potentially meant its 77 million users were vulnerable to credit card fraud. It's taken until now to get the service back online again. Britain's access was restored about 6pm and other regions followed later.

Japan is still not back online because the country's government is seeking more assurances about strengthened security.

The big question that is still unanswered is this: was any credit or debit card information stolen in a usable form? Sony insists that its data was protected and there have been no reports of theft. And anyway, the company says it doesn't store the three-digit security code on the back of cards on its servers, instead taking this from users with every transaction.

Another question is why it took Sony so long to confirm the attack. It happened on 17, 18 or 19 April and yet was only confirmed on 26 April. It blamed the hack on the Anonymous collective but Anonymous have denied responsibility.

Sony says that it's vital for users to change their PSN passwords (and change their passwords generally if they use the same one on several sites) as soon as the service resumes in their area. They're hoping to calm the inevitable consumer agenda with a choice of free games and other goodies.

In the US, the company is offering $1m identity theft insurance and a similar scheme is expected to be extended to Britain.

As I type, I'm looking at an updated user agreement . . . I wonder if it there will be a clause in there saying I can't blame Sony if something similar happens again. Oh well, let's hope Sony is better at rebuilding network servers than I am at steering Sackboy around.

Helen Lewis is deputy editor of the New Statesman. She has presented BBC Radio 4’s Week in Westminster and is a regular panellist on BBC1’s Sunday Politics.

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On Wheels

A new poem by Patrick Mackie

The hills swarm and soften towards the end of the day just as
flames do in a fireplace as the evening
loosens and breaks open and lets out night.
A nasty, grotesque, impatient year ended,
and the new one will be bitter,
tired, opaque. Words wrangle in every inch of air,
their mouths wide open in stupid shock
at what they have just heard every time they hear anything. Venus,
though, blazes with heavy wobbles of albeit frozen
light. Brecht, who I like to call my
brother just as he called Shelley his,
has a short late poem where he sits by a roadside, waiting
while someone changes the wheel on his car,
watching with impatience, despite not liking
either the place that he is coming from or
the place that he is going to. We call it
connectivity when in truth it is just aggression
and imitation writ ever larger. Poems, though,
are forms of infinite and wry but also briskly
impatient patience. Brecht’s poem seems to end,
for instance, almost before you
can read it. It wheels. The goddess is just a big, bright
wilderness but then soon enough she clothes
herself again in the openness of night and I lose her.

Patrick Mackie’s latest collection, The Further Adventures Of The Lives Of The Saints, is published by CB Editions.

This article first appeared in the 18 May 2017 issue of the New Statesman, Age of Lies

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