Cameron's approval rating plummets

Further evidence that the Tory leader has not "sealed the deal"

In the wake of recent polls showing that the next election is now likely to produce a hung parliament, the Conservatives have been comforted by David Cameron's personal ratings, which have remained robust. British politics are becoming increasingly presidential, making the Tories confident they will win out.

But now a new PoliticsHome poll has shown a significant fall in Cameron's approval rating in the past two months. On 18 September, his leadership approval score stood at +36, but by 27 November it had fallen to +21. The Tory leader's 17-point lead over Nick Clegg has been reduced to 7 points.

Significantly, the fall in support for Cameron is not tied to a general shift against the party leaders. Over the same period, Gordon Brown's approval rating has risen from -55 to (a still dismal) -46.

Perhaps the Tories need not worrry: Cameron retains a convincing lead over the PM. But the poll reinforces the sense that suddenly, for a number of reasons, the public is re-examining its views on both Cameron and his party. Those who complacently suggested only a fortnight ago that Cameron was "closing the deal" will have to re-examine their assumptions, too.

 

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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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Cabinet audit: what does the appointment of Liam Fox as International Trade Secretary mean for policy?

The political and policy-based implications of the new Secretary of State for International Trade.

Only Nixon, it is said, could have gone to China. Only a politician with the impeccable Commie-bashing credentials of the 37th President had the political capital necessary to strike a deal with the People’s Republic of China.

Theresa May’s great hope is that only Liam Fox, the newly-installed Secretary of State for International Trade, has the Euro-bashing credentials to break the news to the Brexiteers that a deal between a post-Leave United Kingdom and China might be somewhat harder to negotiate than Vote Leave suggested.

The biggest item on the agenda: striking a deal that allows Britain to stay in the single market. Elsewhere, Fox should use his political capital with the Conservative right to wait longer to sign deals than a Remainer would have to, to avoid the United Kingdom being caught in a series of bad deals. 

Stephen Bush is special correspondent at the New Statesman. He usually writes about politics.