Reductio ad Stalinum

Boris compares the 50p tax with Stalin's campaign against the kulaks

Boris Johnson writes today: "[T]he 50p tax is not far, in its political motive, from Stalin's assault on the kulaks."

I'm used to right-wingers trotting out the cliché that Labour wants to "tax the rich until the pips squeak" (never actually said by Denis Healey), but I hadn't anticipated a comparison with the man who pledged to "liquidate the kulaks as a class".

Johnson isn't the first Telegraph columnist to make such an inappropriate comparison. Last week Janet Daley absurdly compared the EU with the Warsaw Pact.

As in the case of its better-known cousin, reductio ad Hitlerum, there should be an informal moratorium on this sort of thing.

Johnson's remarks will delight Tory activists, many of whom loathe the new tax, but they once more put him at odds with David Cameron and George Osborne, who have insisted that everyone must pay their "fair share". Osborne has even defended the 50p rate on the grounds that it will help foster a "more equal society".

This isn't the first time that Johnson has used his Telegraph column to criticise the tax. There is perhaps no other issue on which he writes and speaks with such fervour. Should he continue in his role as unofficial spokesman for the grass-roots campaign against the tax, this could become dangerous for Cameron.


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George Eaton is political editor of the New Statesman.

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En français, s'il vous plaît! EU lead negotiator wants to talk Brexit in French

C'est très difficile. 

In November 2015, after the Paris attacks, Theresa May said: "Nous sommes solidaires avec vous, nous sommes tous ensemble." ("We are in solidarity with you, we are all together.")

But now the Prime Minister might have to brush up her French and take it to a much higher level.

Reuters reports the EU's lead Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, would like to hold the talks in French, not English (an EU spokeswoman said no official language had been agreed). 

As for the Home office? Aucun commentaire.

But on Twitter, British social media users are finding it all très amusant.

In the UK, foreign language teaching has suffered from years of neglect. The government may regret this now . . .

Julia Rampen is the editor of The Staggers, The New Statesman's online rolling politics blog. She was previously deputy editor at Mirror Money Online and has worked as a financial journalist for several trade magazines.